Saturday, March 25, 2017

ReFoReMo Day 24: Janie Reinart Unwraps a Reflection



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ReFoReMo taught me to unwrap a picture book like a gift.

Let's use Helen's Big World by Doreen Rappaport as an example. Doreen weaves a story for us

filled with poetic writing and quotes.


1. The Wrapping/Book Jacket 

What draws your eyes to the cover ? What is happening?
                 
Where and when does it take place?



1. Soft Watercolor portrait. Title in Braille at top. Looks old fashioned.




2. The Tissue/ End Papers

 What do the end papers look like? What is the feeling or mood?

2. Joyfulness and hopefulness invite me in.
The quote suggests a positive focus.


2. The back paper is another invitation to practice the signs.
























 3. The Gift/ Story

 What type of story structure does the plot follow? Circular, Linear, Parallel, Classic, etc?

 The first sentence of the story should draw you in.

 Helen gurgled and giggled in her crib.

 The last sentence should be satisfying. There should be a connection between the beginning and
 ending of the story.

She kept traveling and speaking, 
always saying what she thought was important, 
until she died at the age of eighty-seven.



I wear this gift of a story as inspiration for all the possibilities in a life time.



How do these three elements impact your mentor texts?






                                                                                                                                                               
Janie Reinart has worn many hats--educator, author, theater major, professional puppeteer, interactive musical storyteller, a clown hat in a hospital’s gentle clowning ministry, and a poet's beret at an inner city school helping children find their voice. She lives in Ohio with
her husband. She's always up for a game, a song, or dress-up. Ask her thirteen grandchildren.


239 comments:

  1. Janie, I love this perspective on appreciating all of the components of a book. Until I began to pursue publishing, I hadn't thought very much about the care and deliberation that goes into things like end papers. But your comments remind us that all of these pieces of books are very carefully considered and chosen in order to enhance the reader's experience and to bring to fruition the fullness of the author's/illustrator's vision. Thanks for this terrific reminder!

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    1. Jennifer the story is in the details ❤

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  2. Lovely analogy of gift wrappings to the wrappings of a book! Thanks, Janie!

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  3. I'm of the belief that all picture books are gifts--they certainly make great gifts too. ;) Loved the analogy and your examples. Thanks, Janie!

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    1. Rebecca, I agree. I'm always giving books as gifts to my grandkids ❤.

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  4. Your post is a gift for us to open this Saturday morning. A lovely way to begin the day. Thank you!

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  5. Very cool analogy. Thanks so much!

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  6. Thank you for the tools to look closer at the PB's we are reading. This one looks lovely!

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    1. Cathy, it is one of my favorites ❤.

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  7. Thank you for your lovely post on a Saturday morning filled with errands but filled with the promise of reading more picture books this afternoon. Carole Calladine

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  8. Lovely post--and it makes me excited to reread this beautiful book, which I haven't read in a while. My only problem is that the cover and endpapers are so often done with no input from the author. So I can wish the publisher would do a certain thing for my book, but it rarely happens. The beginning/ending of the text, of course, are another story (hehe)--the one I DO have control over. Happy Saturday!

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    1. Laura, do the powers that be ever engage in a discussion with the author about end pages etc.?

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    2. Nope, not really. Not with me, anyway. Maybe with big-name authors...?

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  9. Thank you for helping to unwrap this special gift!

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  10. What a beautifully presented and thoughtful post Janie! Thanks for sharing.

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    1. So happy you enjoyed it, Lynette ๐Ÿ˜Š

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  11. Janie, such a lovely way to imagine a book, as a gift. This is a very wonderful post sharing a book I have not yet read. TY

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    1. Yeah, Kathy a new one to look at๐Ÿ˜Š.

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  12. How true, books are gifts. Thanks for this beautiful example.

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    1. My favorite thing to give ๐ŸŽ.

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  13. I love the idea of opening a book as a gift, not knowing what I'm going to find on the inside. I have done this intuitively my whole life, as I always feel excited to "open the box" of a new book and enjoy its content.

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    1. I agree❤ It's like that for journals and and a new box of crayons .

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  14. Reminds me of the quote: A book is a gift you can open again and again. (Can't remember who said it, though :() Thanks, Janie. So true.

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  15. Janie, you've presented a lovely way to savor a picture book. Thank you!

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  16. A wonderful comparison of unwrapping a gift! Thank you Janie!

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    1. It's like a birthday party ๐ŸŽ‰

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  17. Thank you, Janie, for your very thoughtful comments this Saturday morning:>

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    1. Polly have a great day๐Ÿ˜Š.

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  18. Hi, Janie! Thanks for sharing this thoughtful tribute to picture books. Everytime I fill my library bag with creative books, I feel very lucky.

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    1. Manju, metaphors be with you ๐Ÿ˜Š.

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  19. Good Morning Janie, Thank you for the gift to unwrap. I have several PBs I plan to unwrap today it was great to start with your gift. thank you.

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    1. Terri, let me know your favorites from today๐Ÿ˜Š

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  20. Janie, thank you for this post. And for the gift analogy. It is another way to look at our MS to make sure they are doing what we want them to do. I can't wait to read this beautiful book.

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  21. This is such a beautiful analogy. A great PB is a gift indeed!

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  22. Your post is packed with wonderful insight, Janie! I'm going to check that book out and really think about it as I research and write PB biographies. (And I'll read it to my kids!)

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    1. Robin, Metaphors be with you. I'm working on PB biography too๐Ÿ˜Š.

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  23. I had not seen this book! So beautiful. And what a wonderful way to consider a mentor text!

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    1. Helen was amazing. The book is a lovely tribute❤

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  24. Janie, thank you for your wonderful gift this morning. I enjoyed it from beginning to end. I'll be "unwrapping" mentor texts all weekend with the insight you gifted!

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  25. What a lovely gift you have given us, Janie! Thanks for a new perspective on reading a picture book.

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  26. Thanks for your post on this rainy Saturday morning. Just put the book on hold at the library.

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    1. You are welcome, Sara. I had to buy my own copy๐Ÿ˜Š

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  27. What a delightful post, Janie.It was truly a gift. Thank you for your insight on this particular book. I loved reading that you are a theater major--I am, too. We can use that training when we work with children, can't we?

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    1. Sherri, How fun. Have you ever acted out your story while you are writing it? I sometimes walk around like my character lol. Only another theater major would understand ๐Ÿ˜Š

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  28. Such a great way to look at books. And I know I get as excited looking at a library book shelf as I do looking under a Christmas tree.

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    1. David, I understand and feel that way just walking into the library or a book store๐Ÿ˜Š.

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  29. These three things to consider as we read books are a gift for us! Thank you. And a new book to locate and enjoy. Double thanks!

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    1. Angie a double you are welcome ๐Ÿ˜Š

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  30. Thank you, Janie, for your luscious introduction into the parts which give us, the reader, a journey into the heart of a great story. You are a gift.

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    1. You are so sweet , Charlotte. And a fabulous critique partner❤

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  31. Thank you Janie for the insights about Helen's Big World by Doreen Rappaport.

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  32. Thanks for sharing your ideas in this post, Janie! It's important to focus on how all parts of a PB work together! Hope your writing is going well :)

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    1. Ann, hope your writing is going well too❤. Methapors be with you.

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  33. Janie thank you for giving me a gift to look at a story more deeply. I'm going to read Helen's Big World by Doreen Rappaport again.

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  34. Picture books are the gifts that keep on giving! Delightful post, Janie.

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  35. This was a wonderful post, thank you, Janie!

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  36. Thank you for highlighting this book. I'm a big fan of Helen Keller.

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    1. Me too, Jennifer. ❤
      https://search.yahoo.com/search?p=video+helen+keller+with+eisenhower&fr=iphone&.tsrc=apple&pcarrier=AT&T&pmcc=310&pmnc=410

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  37. I feel honored that my editor at Knopf engaged me in the design of my text. The end papers themselves tell a valuable story.

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  38. thanks for sharing this book - I like how you give us a tour through the pages.

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  39. What a lovely way to present a lovely book!

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  40. What a wonderful way to reflect today. I think we've (or at least I have) been so consumed with getting all we can from these mentor texts in regards to what lies in between the covers: the words, the emotion, the humor, the feel, the art, the message, the meaning, the characters, the story, the voice, etc. etc.) And Reforemo has been such an amazing tool to help us (me) achieve this. But this reflection post today is so simple yet something I really had to make myself stop and do -- pull myself out of what is in between the covers for a minute, and take a closer -a slower- look at how these pages are "wrapped". I think by Janie encouraging us to do this today, we see a picture book as the complete "gift" it is.

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    1. Thank you , Melissa ❤ I like slowing down and sitting with a book.

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  41. Thank you for helping us recognize what gifts book jackets, end papers, and the structure of story itself can be if we take the time to really explore them.

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    1. Judy love your idea of exploring the adventure of a story ❤

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  42. What a great analogy, thanks for giving us a new approach/thought process when reading mentor texts.

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  43. Thanks, Janie, for this unique way of making us more aware of appreciating the total book "package." Appreciate your thoughts!

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  44. The cover gets it off the shelf, the opening line draws you in and the story invites you to read again!

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  45. I've learned a lot from ReFoReMo. A lot of elements have to come together to make the perfect PB. Thanks!

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  46. Janie, I love this post! Thanks for making what we learn from ReFoReMo so concrete! Love that we're working together!

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    1. Kirsti, me too! Methapors be with you❤

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  47. A lovely way to read through our mentor texts. Thank-you for these guiding questions! Liz Tipping

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  48. Oooh, I like that analogy - unwrapping a picture book like a gift! Thanks, Janie!

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  49. Hi Janie, thanks for "gifting" us with an alternate way to present a book. I'm currently putting the finishing touches on a historical pb and I definitely plan to go back and look at it as a gift I'm presenting to readers. :)

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  50. Thank you for this beautiful way of unwrapping a book. I enjoy the imagery.

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  51. Great analogy and a reminder that we're not supposed to judge a book by it's cover, but we do. If it's uninviting we don't unwrap (or buy).

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  52. What a beautiful book - on so many levels! Love your gift analogy. It is so apt.

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  53. Janie, I love that you created this checklist for us to ponder as we read our mentor texts. Good tips! Thank you.

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  54. Janie, it 's a wonderful gift for me to see my PBS fellow picture book author's "take" on unwrapping a book. Such a nice analogy. Loved it! Thanks for an inspiring post.

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  55. Janie, thanks for sharing this analogy. And I'm going to read "Helen's Big World", too--just ordered it from the library. I love every part of a book--the cover, end papers, and, of course, the story, too!

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    1. I especially love Helen's quotes❤

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  56. The wrapping, the tissue, and the gift... thanks for the images. Now to work on getting just the right gift for the recipient!

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  57. Janie,
    No gift like the present moment and that is what you' be given to us in this thoughtful post. I'm picking up a copy of this mentor text now from the library.

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    1. Susan,the Braille dots are a great idea.

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  58. Forest Gump. A book is a gift-wrapped box of chocolates, so much to taste. Great post!

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  59. A lovely reflection for my Saturday. I look forward to reading this book and applying your checklist to my reading of mentor texts.

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  60. I love this analogy, Janie. And I look forward to unwrapping Helen's Big World. Thank you!

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  61. Janie..I LOVED how you presented one book...unwrapping it's layers for us, like the most precious gift. Thank you for an inspiring post!

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    1. Vivian, looking forward to your precious book coming out soon❤

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  62. Lovely analogy and so true. I'm sitting here in the library this afternoon, opening gift after gift after gift.....

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    1. Julianne what a lovely way to spend time.

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  63. Wonderful way to view a picture book. I hope I can read the Helen Keller book soon.

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    1. Debbie, I especially liked the quotes ❤

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  64. Janie, what a wonderful way to present picture books! Unwrapping a gift - brilliant. I can't wait to find this book. Thanks for the great post.

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    1. Glad you enjoyed the post๐Ÿ˜Š

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  65. This is such an insightful way to describe experiencing a picture book not "just" as a reader, an author or an illustrator, but as a connoisseur of an art form.

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    1. Kim, You are so right about the book as art form❤

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  66. JANIE: THANK YOU for sharing such a BEAUTIFUL example by using this BEAUTIFUL book to help us discover how to open and savor, and ultimately learn from each picture book as a TRUE gift! As someone fluent in and IN LOVE with ASL, I SO APPRECIATE that you used this book as an example. I CAN'T WAIT to read it -- to open this BEAUTIFUL gift, page by page! THANK YOU!!! And THANK YOU for the WONDERFUL work you do in SO MANY ways to bless the lives of SO MANY children -- as well as our lives through your work with ReFoReMo! THANK YOU!!!

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    1. Natalie you are so sweet❤๐Ÿค˜

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  67. Janie! You are such a gift, yourself, to this ReFoReMo experience.

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    1. Thank you, Nancy Jo. How very kind of you❤

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  68. Lovely. Thank you for your thoughts.

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  69. Thanks for your post. Great analogy! I think especially of the anticipation when you "unwrap" a book that you have been waiting to read for a while. I love ReFoReMo, too. I have learned that you can't always judge the gift by its wrapping. I have been pleasantly surprised many times--I've thoroughly enjoyed books that I probably wouldn't have chosen on my own.

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    1. Kristen, I'm with you. ReFoReMo knocks my socks off๐Ÿ˜Š Standing O for Carrie & Kirstine.

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  70. I love to spend time at a bookstore or the library because I'm surrounded by so many wonderful "gifts"! Thank you, Janie, for your mentor text suggestion. Helen's Big World looks like a beautiful book - I can't wait to read it.

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    1. Tracey, I know you will love that book as much as I do ❤

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  72. What a neat perspective. Thank you.

    Ree

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  73. Beautiful story! Thanks for sharing.

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  74. Thank you so much, Janie, for "unwrapping" such a wonderful non-fiction picture book! And your life, devoted to helping others, is clearly such a gift as well.

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    1. Katelyn, thank you for your kind words๐Ÿ˜Š

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  75. I love the idea of unwrapping a Pb like a gift. I thank you for it!

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  76. Thank you, Janie! It was a wonderful post to remind us of the power of picture books.

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  77. Wonderful 'food for thought'; thank you Janie. I'm borrowing this book about Helen Keller from the library.

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    1. Beware you might just have to own your own copy๐Ÿ˜Š

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  78. I liked the way you linked a book's cover and endpapers to the surprise in its pages. Thoughtful post. Thanks, Janie.

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    1. So happy you enjoyed the post❤

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  79. Great analogy of a book as the gift we unwrap with each reading. Thanks, Janie!

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  80. I love the three elements you tied together. I agree the first and last lines are impact-ful, but I haven't considered the end papers very much aside from occasionally noticing that they are pretty. Something else to study! Thank you!

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    1. I am fascinated by the end papers. Need to look up more info about them.

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  81. Happy you enjoyed it๐Ÿ˜Š

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  82. Great elements to reflect upon. Thank you.

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  83. I plan to share your gift analogy when talking about books with children in future presentations. I love helping young readers learn to truly appreciate books.

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    1. Deb,just give me a shout out when you do :) I use this in my presentations too!

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  84. It was only during ReFoReMo this time around that I really discovered book jackets. I've always looked at the covers, but I've never really thought of it the way you have put it now. Thank you! I also started actually reading the jacket flaps, and have been pleasantly surprised, especially with the humorous books. The jackets are just as funny! Thank you for your post.

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    1. Anne the jackets help me with ideas for pitches too๐Ÿ˜Š

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  85. What a lovely post! To me, every story is a wonderful gift.

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    1. Andrea, and when we write our stories, it is exciting to think about gifting them to our readers. :)

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  86. Thank you Janie. I need to read this book as i have a keen interst to write inspirational stories of people who did great and need to be known to the world. Stay smiling and keep inspiring us!

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    1. Thank you, Shllpa. Metaphors be with you :)

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  87. A lovely warm-hearted post, thank you Janie. From now on I won't be in quite such a hurry to get to the text, but will savour the wrapping too.

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  88. Thank you Janie... I am just working on endpapers and cover design this month for my debut picture book. I love the thought it will one day be unwrapped like a gift! And I DO love to create beautiful present packages; what a neat way to approach the design.

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    1. Aidan, congrats on your book baby :) Can you let us know more about your PB yet?

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  89. I'm in LOVE with endpapers and book design. It's so hard to make a decision about what I like best. Two years ago, I posted about my favorites from the books I read for ReFoReMo. It's such a joy to take the time to enjoy EVERYTHING about each book! Thanks for sharing your insights w/us. I can't wait to read Helen's Big World! ( http://julicaveny.blogspot.com/2015/05/reading-from-cover-to-cover-joy-of.html )

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    1. Thanks for the post, Juliann. Looking forward to reading it :)

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  90. Such a beautiful way to approach a book. I remember loving endpapers as a kid, and I still love them now. I like to dream about the endpapers for several of my own stories...

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  91. Thank you for showing us how to unwrap a book.

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  92. A book I will go find at the library!

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  93. A thoughtful way of appreciating all aspects of a book. Thank you.

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  94. I agree—books are among the best of gifts. Thank you for opening this one with us.
    Susan

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    1. Susan, I have so much fun sending books to my grandkids.❤

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  95. A lovely look at a lovely book.

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  96. I love unwrapping endpapers. Sometimes they are a delightful gift. Thank you for your lovely post...a gift to treasure.

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  97. OH my goodness, Janie. You have such a gift for analyzing and observation. This was a pure joy to read. I thank you very much for this. Insightful.

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    1. Pam you are so kind. So happy you liked the post.

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  98. Thank you, Janie, for unwrapping a beautiful book. There are many important elements of picture book. While we always enjoy unwrapping the story, its' just as important to remember the book jacket and end papers. I look forward to reading HELEN'S BIG WORLD by Doreen Rappaport.
    ~Suzy Leopold

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  99. I loved that the book about Helen Keller had Braille. It's important to make books available for the blind. Textured books are a way to help them visualize.

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