Monday, March 6, 2017

ReFoReMo Day 7: Meredith Mundy Values Comparison Titles


By Meredith Mundy

Before I started as an editorial assistant in 1994, I dreamed that my new job would consist of sitting in a fancy office building in NYC reading piles of brilliant picture book manuscripts, selecting the best among them, making a few helpful suggestions to the author, and sending the text off to an illustrator. Before long, a bound copy of the book would magically appear on my desk.

I was right about the fancy office building and the brilliant manuscripts, but I was clueless about the publication process!

My job as an editor does include a ton of reading and editing, but I’m also a salesperson. When I find a text I want to acquire, a big part of my job is convincing my colleagues to believe in it, too.

I must first “sell” the manuscript to my editorial director, then to all the children’s editors, and then to our Sales and Marketing departments during a formal “Pub Board” meeting. Only if I can convince all of these people of the project’s financial and educational/entertainment potential am I actually able to acquire it.

This process is easier if an author has a great “track” of successful books. But some of our authors are unpublished, or only have one book under their belts. How, then, can I convince my colleagues that the brand new, untested project is worth the risk?

The secret is to provide a list of the best, most relevant “comp” (comparison) titles. Editors spend a good chunk of time combing the internet and bookstore shelves to find books that are in some way similar to the one they’re dying to acquire. If I’m lucky, I’ll find a few shining examples that have received good reviews or have strong sales. This goes a long way toward reassuring the team that a new (and somehow similar) project is worthy of publication.

In the summer of 2015 I received a submission for a picture book biography about the fascinating (but largely unknown) computer scientist Grace Hopper. None of us had heard of her, and, as a house, we had never tried to publish a picture book biography because we assumed it would sell only to schools and libraries and not to our general trade audience. But I adored this text by author Laurie Wallmark and I couldn’t get it out of my mind. I wanted EVERYONE to know about Grace! I went on a hunt for other picture book biographies, and found several titles that I thought made a great case for this genre’s success.

My favorites spanned a wide range:


Books about people most everyone knows (Albert Einstein, Audrey Hepburn):















And books about people few readers have encountered (a mathematician and a wildly successful con man):















My most helpful finds were books about obscure but fascinating women (astronomer Henrietta Leavitt, horticulturalist Kate Sessions, and computer programmer Ada Lovelace).




By providing these comps, I was able to convince my in-house team to take a chance on an author who had published only one other book, but clearly had vision and a terrific talent for conveying complex information to young readers. It was a triumph when the project was given the green light. I can’t wait for the book to come out in May.


If you are an author submitting your work to editors—whether it’s a fairytale retelling or a work of nonfiction on an obscure topic, consider including a few key comp titles in your cover letter. The editor will thank you when she falls in love with your text and has to put on her sales hat to convince her whole team to love it, too!



Meredith is giving away two copies of GRACE HOPPER: QUEEN OF COMPUTER CODE, written by Laurie Wallmark and illustrated by Katy Wu, which will pub in May 2017. To be eligible for the drawing at the conclusion of ReFoReMo, please comment on this post and strive to read mentor texts regularly. 

                                                                 

Meredith Mundy has been editing books for young readers for 22 years, and hopes to continue doing so for at least 22 more! She is currently Executive Editor at Sterling Children’s Books, where she acquires everything from board books to young adult novels. Check out Sterling’s website at sterlingpublishing.com and connect with Meredith on Twitter at @mm4tweets.

189 comments:

  1. Thanks for your post on the importance of comparable titles, Meredith.

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  2. Meredith,
    biographies are my favorite too. I loved Just Being Audrey and tricky Vic-who knew?! Yes I will remember your suggestions to get comparable titles. Perhaps that works for all types of manuscripts that we send in.

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  3. Comp titles are so tricky for me - thanks for your post. Yale just renamed one of its colleges for Grace Hopper. Between that and QUEEN OF COMPUTER CODE, it's going to be a very good year for Ms. Hopper.

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  4. It's always nice to hear insider information...comp titles are difficult sometimes, but now I fully see the value in including them with a query. Thanks for sharing.

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  5. Meredith, thank you so much for your insightful post about comp titles, and for the awesome recommendations! Biographies are my absolute favorites, but I would never have imagined that editors would find comparable titles helpful. It makes so much sense now that you have explained how it all works--thank you so much! (And I will be sure to have my girls read these books also. We'll have a lot of fun together with these :-) )

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  6. Thanks for the post! I've heard the suggestion to provide potential comp titles in cover letters. Now I understand a little better why. Thanks for the tip.

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  7. I have come to know, more and more as of late, what an editor's job looks like and I just have to thank you for all of your hard work. Gosh, providing comp titles is not only a great idea, but the least we could do.😊Thanks, Meredith!

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  8. I learned a lot about the publication process from your post. I'm a big fan of narrative nonfiction picture books and love the comps you mentioned. I really look forward to reading GRACE HOPPER, QUEEN OF COMPUTER CODE!

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  9. Thank you for explaining why providing comparable titles in a query letter is so important. Thanks to ReFoReMo I know which ones they are for my manuscripts :-).

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  10. TY, Meredith for a peek into your process to acquisition! Good to know that comp titles can make a difference. This book sound fabulous.

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  11. This post was extremely helpful today. I've wondered if I should include comparable titles in cover letters and now I know that I probably should. Thank you!

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  12. There are so many things I love about the BOY WHO LOVED MATH. I read it over and over again for so many different reasons. Thank you for your work.

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  13. Great information Meredith - thank you! Looking forward to Laurie and Katy's book.Grace is a fascinating subject.

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  14. This is a great post and very timely for me - just today I was doing research on comp titles and cover letters. Thank you for your insights!

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  15. Thanks for sharing, Meredith! I have read most of the books on your list, except LOOK UP.

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  17. Comps are so difficult for me - thanks for showing the importance of them.

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  18. FGM KalavritinosMarch 6, 2017 at 8:12 AM
    I have always enjoyed reading children's PB biographies. Can't wait to read the books mentioned here. Thank you, Meredith, for explaining why comp titles are so important in query letters.

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  19. Thank you for explaining how you use comp titles! Very interesting. I love pb biographies!

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  20. Ooh. This book looks lovely. I love PB bios!

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  21. Such a great collection! Thanks!

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  22. Wow, fantastic post Meredith! Knowing how editors work helps a LOT! Thanks for sharing.

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  23. Thank you, Meredith, for this golden advice! I love hearing a behind-the-scenes story straight from the editor's "mouth." So valuable.

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  24. Thanks Meredith for sharing your valuable insight into the process of selling a manuscript...As authors, we just want to tell our story. Seldom, did I consider the publishing questions; what sells a story or makes it a good buy? ..I enjoyed your post and suggestions!

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  25. Thank you for this post on comparison books and the importance of finding them.

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  26. Great post! Thanks, Meredith, for sharing your insight into how an editor goes about "selling" a proposal. These comp titles also make good mentor texts. And I'm glad there will be a picture book out about Admiral Grace Hopper soon.

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  27. Thanks for the window into your world. I did not realize the true significance of comp titles until now.
    Thanks for your post, Meredith!

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  28. Wow. This is really good advice. It has me thinking about comp titles for my manuscripts. Thanks for a behind- the- scenes look at publishing.

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  29. Thanks, Meredith! I love biographies, specially when they're done in such creative ways like these on your list. I have an idea for one but it hasn't made it's way to the computer yet. Your post made me think about comps for my WIP, and finding them, the really good, spot on comps, doesn't seem like an easy task.

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  30. Thanks so much for this amazing post, Meredith! It was incredible to get this perspective. Thanks for sharing your secret- provide the best, most relevant comp titles! After this post, I know we're all on it!

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  31. I'm working on a pb biography so this post was extremely helpful! Thank you Meredith! I look forward to reading about the amazing Grace ;)

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  32. I recently realized how much I love picture book biographies! Thank you for suggesting a few I haven't read already and reminding me of how powerful a short biography can be!

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  33. I've often wondered how an editor convinces others about a beloved book. Comp titles sound like a great tool in the arsenal.

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  34. Including comparable titles is a great idea. Thank you, Meredith, for listing some of your favorite PBs.

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  35. Thank you Meredith for the helpful advice. I do that (write comps) sometimes in my query letters...and I will now do it every time:>

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  36. Fascinating glimpse into the acquisitions process, Meredith. Thank you - and I love the list you've provided for ReFoReMo!

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  37. Great post, Meredith. Several of my favorites listed here! It's got me thinking about comp titles for my manuscripts too.

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  38. Thank you Meredith! Listing comp titles in the cover letter, great tip! Interesting to hear what goes into acquiring a story. Thanks again!

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  39. Oh, I can't wait to read about Grace Hopper!

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  40. Great advice, Meredith, and a great list of titles. Looking forward to reading Sterling's first PB biography in May!

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  41. Thank you Meredith. This is very good information. I am about to write my first cover letter. I can't wait to read your suggested titles.

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  42. Thank you for this information on the acquisition process!

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  43. Love this post! You've given us so much: Inspiration! Insight! NF Mentor Text (and I'm heading to the bookstore this week!) Thank-you. ~Juli

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  44. Talk about being clueless! I didn't even know "comparison titles" was a thing! But obviously, thinking about "comp" titles can be very useful. Thank you, Meredith, for the peek at the process you (and editors in general) go through with their acquisitions, and what they have to think about to make a book happen.

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  45. Comparison texts is a good point for a new author. I've never thought about how vital that is. Thanks for sharing!

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  46. As a new author I'm always looking for comparison texts just to make sure that something like that isn't already out on the market. I didn't think of it as a selling point for my work. Thanks!

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  47. Thanks! I am currently drafting a picture book biography and am drafting several more--- comp titles have been immensely helpful just in terms of drafting.

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  48. Thanks for your informative and inspiring post!

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  49. I am so glad to see picture book biographies! The ones I've read have been wonderful! I've learned so much from them and I know young readers will too. Thanks for sharing with us!

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  50. Thanks for the insights and sharing with us the importance of comps.

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  51. Thank you for introducing me to some amazing new people this morning!

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  52. Great post, Meredith! I love biographies and am glad to know that including comparable titles in ones query letter can be helpful

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  53. I have two of those books and can't wait to read the rest. Insightful article. Thank you.

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  54. Thanks, Meredith, for reminding me of the importance of comps. I always knew it was good to include comps when querying, but now I have an even greater resolve to really do it!! I'm loving biographies more and more and loved reading your recommendations. A motivating post!

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  55. Thank you for explaining the importance of including comp titles in a query letter.

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  56. So helpful, Meredith, on getting an editor's perspective as well as researching and including comp titles!

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  57. Thank you for this. I never looked at comp titles from the editor's perspective. I appreciate the insight. Loved the Tree lady. Thanks for the post!

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  58. Thank you for sharing an inside look in the book acquisition process, and how important comp titles are.

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  59. Your advice on how comps work is SO helpful. Thank you, Thank you! And I can't wait to read your recommendations!

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  61. Thank you, Meredith, for a peek into the editor's job and the comp titles which helped you make acquisition decisions.

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  62. Thanks for a great post. I look forward to reading GRACE HOPPER, QUEEN OF COMPUTER CODE.

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  63. Thanks for the great advice and for sharing your favorite biographies, Meredith. Can't wait to read this new PB about Grace Hopper.

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  64. Thanks Meredith for explaining your role as a salesperson and the importance of comp titles. Much appreciation.

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  65. Thank you so much for your thought provoking list of titles but also tips for our queries. Thanks again your post!

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  66. That's a lot of people to sell to! No wonder comp titles are so important! Thanks for this post

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  67. Offering comp titles is a great, often overlooked, way for authors to put themselves a little ahead of the rest! Thank you Meredith, and congratulations on "Grace Hopper: Queen of Computer Code"!

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  68. Ah!!! I struggle over this all the time, and was literally debating whether or not I should include comp titles in my query that I am sending out for a submission today! Sometimes I mention comp titles, and sometimes I don't. I'd be curious to know what the majority do if the agent/editor does not specifically ask for it. I don't know if it's better to leave in or take out. I think mentioning them helps the editor/agent place my story better, and it also shows I know what I am talking about and have done my research and am current in the world of kid lit in regards to what is in the market now. However, it also adds length to my query when I add the comp title section it, and I know it needs to stay short and sweet. So, I never know what's best!

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  69. Thanks for giving us great ideas!

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  70. Thanks for this interesting post and tips for finding comp titles.

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  71. Thanks for the insight and great suggestions!

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  72. I find it hard when I can't find many comp titles. Yes, that means I have an unique story, but does that hurt me? Comp titles are tricky.

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  73. This is so useful to know. Thanks for the tip. I'm looking forward to reading about Grace in May!

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  74. Thank you so much for this post. It is very helpful to hear which type of comps were most helpful in getting the acquisitions team to accept a biography on a little know individual.

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  75. This was very informative. Thank you!

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  76. This makes perfect sense! Thanks, Meredith, for this insightful and helpful post.

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  77. Thank you Meredith. Lovely to hear about the acquisitions process from an insider.

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  78. Thank you for the insight and tip on providing comps, Meredith. I enjoyed reading your post.

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  79. Thanks for sharing some behind-the-scenes scoop on the process, Meredith! I so enjoyed your post. :)

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  80. Thanks for explaining why comp titles are important!

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  81. Ada Byron Lovelace and the Thinking Machine is one of my favorite PB biographies! I look forward to reading the other mentor texts, especially On A Beam of Light. Thanks for this illuminating post on comp titles, Meredith!

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  82. Thanks for the great advice, Meredith.

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  83. Thanks, Meredith! I am working on nonfiction PB and it helps to know about including comp titles in my cover letter! Lynn

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  84. Great post--and picture book biographies have been on such a great track the past several years. It's wonderful to see such creative and satisfying books!

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  85. I love books about empowerment, can-do attitudes in young people, and girls in mighty roles, which I share with my 3 daughters. I can't wait to share this latest tale with my science-minded oldest!

    As an author, I appreciate the tips on comp titles, and they're particularly well-timed for me. I've been doing comp research in the last several weeks, for my latest query. I don't think I'll ever write a query in the future that doesn't feature comp titles (or, at least, I plan to consider comp titles for each book I write). I agree that, as selling points, both for author and agent (and ultimately editor), it's a great thing to have put in the leg-work and given thought to comps. Thanks for your insights!

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  86. Hi Meredith - thanks for providing excellent mentor texts and also a peek into your publishing process and the importance of comp titles! Looking forward to reading about Grace Hopper!

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  87. Growing up I always wanted to read more about women. Thanks for publishing pbs about women.

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  88. Thanks, Meredith! I love PB biographies, and many of the ones you've listed here are among my favorites, especially The Tree Lady (that cover is just stunning!) and On a Beam of Light. Audrey is lovely too.

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  89. Thanks for reminding us of the important of comps. I have a hard time with this because I always think, "How can I even compare myself to these wonderful authors?" However, I will try to break through that negative reasoning. Thank you!

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  90. Great perspective! Thank you, Meredith!

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  91. Great insights in this post. Thank you! I'm still waiting for these books to come in on our inter-library loan. Can't wait to read them.

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  92. What a great idea to go searching for similar in some way titles when submitting a query for a manuscript. But also a wonderful way to get a feel for a genre or them you want to write about...

    Thank you for sharing.

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  93. Insightful post; so much wisdom in using comp titles to pitch your book! And wow--so excited for the release of GRACE HOPPER! This looks like a winner for my girls!

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  94. MEREDITH: THANK YOU for the WONDERFUL idea to both research similar books to the ones we are writing, as well as submitting a list of those books in our query letters! While I spend COUNTLESS HOURS researching the world of children's books on a daily basis, I never thought of including a list of similar books along with my manuscript. WONDERFUL idea! THANK YOU!!!!

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  95. Thanks for giving a glimpse of the challenges an editor might face and how companion titles can be helpful in raising interest in a manuscript. Your post was really informative. I love a good PB biography and look forward to reading those you have suggested.

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  96. Thanks for providing this great info on comp titles.

    (Mary McClellan)

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  97. I learned of Grace Hopper years ago when my daughter received her monthly Highlights for Children magazine in the mail. They had a long article on her. But I'd never thought to write a book about her. Glad someone did and can't wait to read it.

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  98. Grace Hopper was our keynote speaker when we graduated college. I remember her, but didn't know anything about her. I'll be interested in reading this book. Thanks for sharing!

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  99. Thanks for the comp hot tip. Good to know.
    maria johnson

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  100. Excellent insight into the value of comp titles -- thanks, Meredith!

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  101. I appreciate the suggestion of adding comp titles in a query letter. Looking forward to reading all about Grace Hopper soon!

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  102. It was very interesting and informative to read about your acquisition process. I really enjoyed several of the titles you recommended - particularly Look Up. Thank you!

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  103. Thank you, Meredith. I love biographies, and I appreciate the information you provided here today.

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  104. Last year, during ReFoReMo, I fell in love with PB biographies. Thanks for adding some new titles to my list.

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  105. Thank you for this helpful post. I write biographies and love to read biographies. This makes a lot of sense. I will try this when I next submit.

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  106. Great info here, Meredith, about comp titles. I've been curious about those.
    Thanks!

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  107. I love hearing about the publishing process from your perspective, Meredith. Thanks, too, for the tip about comps and the suggested list of titles. I'm unfamiliar with some of the books and look forward to reading those!

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  108. Thanks for the post. There are some great titles here and I can't wait to read through them all!

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  109. I love thinking up comp titles! So glad to see they are used on the agent/editor's end, too.

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  110. Looking forward to reading the books mentioned in this post! Thanks very much for your insights and advice!

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  111. Thanks for the post--it's so interesting to hear about the process of publishing--and championing--a book. I have a hard time coming up with comp titles, but I'll work on it (or maybe find someone to help me). I also really enjoyed the stories I've read from your list so far--I got so caught up in the stories that I forgot to pay attention to what makes them good. Guess I'll have to read them again.

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  112. I enjoy writing biographies about unknown, unsung heroes. Thank you, Meredith for sharing your experience through the process of publishing. I especially like the tip to seek out a comp title.

    ~Suzy Leopold

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  113. Thank you for the insights and thought process behind selecting comp titles, Meredith! I can't wait to read Laurie's next book!

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  114. Wonderful to know all about comp titles, thank you.

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  115. I know the post wasn't specifically about biographies, but I've been much more of a fan of PB's with humor/silliness/hilarity--not non-fiction. Yet for a PB idea about a gorilla and baby, I decided to read up on Jane Goodall (a bio written by a wonderful PB author, Sudipta Bardhan-Quallen). I stand in amazement about how easily work with children's PB's changes my stubborn mind about things!

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  116. Thanks for the helpful advice and for the reading suggestions. I especially enjoyed the titles that were new to me: Just Being Audrey and Tricky Vic. I look forward to reading Laurie Wallmark's book about Grace Hopper, too.

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  117. As someone with a Computer Science background and a father who was in the Navy, I find it hard to believe there are people who never heard of Grace Hopper! But it sounds like there will be many fewer of them when this PB biography comes out. I'm looking forward to it. Thank you so much for showing how you actually use Comp titles to promote a manuscript. Very helpful!

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  118. Thank you for the wonderful post. Now I realize something that has been missing from my query letters. I understand better why comps are so important.

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  119. Meredith, thank you for the very helpful post. I will include comp titles in my future query letters!

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  120. I just watched a webinar on picture book biographies. It's now something I'm considering trying. Thank you for the mentor texts.

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  121. Great post Meredith! Good to know how the process works behind the scenes. Love these titles and Laurie's book!

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  122. Thank you for your post. GRACE HOPPER sounds fascinating.

    Ree

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  123. I didn't know that comps would help your book--I mistakenly thought that publishers wanted a book with few comps so they would have a bigger market. This is a game changer. Thanks!

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  124. Love biographies especially about less well-known people. Looking forward to reading the Grace Hopper bio and thanks for the advice about comps.

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  125. Great books! My five-year-old love the book about Ada Lovelace.

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  126. What a fun - and daunting job! As a heavy "end user" of the process, thank you!

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  127. Thank you, Meredith for a very helpful post.

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  128. I really appreciate a view of the importance of comps from the editorial side, showing why they are helpful down the line. Thank you!

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  129. Can't wait to see Laurie's new book. I just came up with an idea for a NF book about an Iraqi born female architect, only to see one coming out about her in May from Beach Lane Books. Great minds think alike.

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  130. What wonderful insights! It's helpful to see the viewpoint of picture book biographies for those less known individuals, as that is where my interests are focused. Many thanks indeed!

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  131. Loved this post! Thanks so much! - Alice Fulgione

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  132. Thank you for your post! I've always been nervous about listing comp titles. Now I will give it a little more thought. Thanks!

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  133. I am very excited about children's non-fiction featuring women in the sciences, and I can't wait to tear into Grace Hopper!!

    Wonderful reading list. Making non-fiction that is both educational and genuinely entertaining is such a challenge. I look forward to the research!

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  134. Thank you Meredith for your insightful post and the valuable recommendations.

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  135. Thank you Meredith for the helpful advice. It's nice to see the view of comp titles from the editorial side.

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  136. Thank you Meredith for your post. I've always been hesitant to provide comp titles. What if the editor/agent hates the book I mention? Or what if they absolutely love the comp title and have already formulated an expectation of mine?
    It's a trap! :)

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  137. Thanks for the mentor texts. They are fantastic! I'm also hesitant about giving comp titles but now have a better understanding.

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  138. Thank you for the insight into your life as an editor and for bringing my attention to some excellent books. I love picture book biographies--they expand kids' (and my) notions of how people impact our world.

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  139. Thanks for sharing your valuable insights about comparative texts.

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  140. Thank you for your insights. I am going to read the books that you suggested.

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  141. I confess, I rarely choose nonfiction when I'm perusing kidlit shelves. But I enjoyed reading the titles you suggested. Thanks for the tip about including comp titles with submissions.

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  142. Thanks for sharing this post, both the books and the tips!

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  143. Interesting! I have always been hesitant to include comp titles, but after reading your post, I'm definitely adding them. Thanks! Also, can't wait to read Grace Hopper.

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  144. Thank you for this article. I'll do my best to keep searching for comps for my own stories.

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  145. Nice perspective to hear, especially about the desirability of comp titles. They're sometimes so hard to find, but I guess worth the search.

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  146. Great tip to add comp titles to a cover letter, and I loved the insight shared in this post!

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  147. You convinced me that adding comp titles to a cover letter can be a plus. This post ties in perfectly with reading for research with another benefit. Thanks, Meredith.

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  148. I appreciate the look into the process an editor goes through!

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  149. Such a helpful post! Thank you!

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  150. Thank you for this peek into publishing. It so happens that I'm compiling comp titles to accompany a picture book proposal right now! Very encouraging to have some extra insight. Thanks again, Susan

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  151. Thank you for the inside peek into the life of an editor. Such valuable information!

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  152. I had trouble figuring out comp titles until I read something that made it click for me. The comp titles are like read-alikes lists I used to do for my students. If you liked reading this, try these. So much easier now.

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  153. Thank you for your suggestion to include comp titles. I enjoyed your recommendations. They gave me a new enthusiasm for biographies told in creative ways.

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  154. While I'm familiar with some of these I can't wait to find the rest of these titles (which I will share with my computer programmy 10 year old daughter... we can't wait to read Grace's story!)

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  155. What a very helpful post! And an excellent argument for reading more picture books! (Not that I needed one!) Thank you!

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  156. Thank you for a very insightful post! I'll be on the lookout for comp titles now. Thanks!

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  157. You have opened a lot of eyes, I suspect. Many believe if you just get an agent or an editor who adores your text, that's enough. You've shown even acquiring editors have a marketing job to do, and finding comparable successes is a hefty tool. Thank you, Meredith.

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  158. Thank you for sharing your experience. Findings comps has been daunting, but your post made it a top priority for me.

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  159. thanks for the post. I love PB biographies.

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  160. Clear window into the process from your side of publishing. Advice to ponder - find comparison titles to support submission efforts. Thanks.

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  161. Thank you for such interesting biography picture books.You have also motivated me to be sure to include comp titles in my cover letter.

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  162. I adore picture book biographies! I look forward to reading GRACE HOPPER: QUEEN OF COMPUTER CODE!

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  163. Picture book biographies are such a great way to quickly learn a bit about an interesting person. Your post illustrates how a fantastic sub-genre can get going--someone takes a risk to publish a unique type of book. It works, and then others expand on that idea and connect to it. An amazing collection of books--in this case picture book biographies--grows, and we are all the richer for it! Thank you!

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  164. Great ideas about the comps! Thanks!

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  165. This is wonderful advise! A few editors I have subbed to, have requested comp titles, but not all do. I think I need to make this a part of any submission I make. Thanks for the encouragement to make my queries better.

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  166. Informative and valuable post, Meredith. Thank you! I enjoyed getting a peek into your sales work and the importance of comp titles.

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  167. Fabulous examples.
    Coming from the toy industry, I feel sometimes like I worry too much on competitive titles.

    I've been studying picture books about the same person/ biography to learn the unique ways that a person's story can be told. I've been doing this for years, but ReFoReMo has made me concentrate and focus more, thus get a better understanding and grasp.

    Thank you for sharing your process with us!

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  168. Thanks, Meredith! I really enjoyed your choices and will keep comp titles in mind when I'm ready to query!

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  169. These were all such great comp titles to find! This insider view is very much appreciated! Liz Tipping

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  170. This was a fascinating glimpse at the publishing process. Thanks for sharing!

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  171. Thank you for your insight. I look forward to reading your suggestions.

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  172. Love the post. Mostly glad to put a picture to one of the people I have dealt with at Sterling.

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  173. Your post reinforces what I've heard about comp titles. They can double as mentor texts also. The groups of people that need to be convinced to publish explains the waiting time for replies to authors and reminds us to keep writing while waiting. Thank you.

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  174. Thank you for the peek inside the life of an editor. I appreciate your suggestion to include comp titles in the query letter and will take your advice. I'm also looking forward to reading the picture book biographies. I enjoyed reading The Boy Who Loved Math as soon as it came out.

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  175. A wonderful peek inside your process and your job. Anxious to learn more about Grace Hopper.

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  176. Meredith, thank you for the wise words in submitting and using appropriate book comps. The story of Grace Hopper looks wonderful. Am excited for May when it is released!

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  177. It is eye opening to know why there is a challenge and what kind of effort goes in publishing a book. Thanks a lot for sharing. Its truly helpful.

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  178. Thank you for this great list of books. I've read half of them so far and can't wait to read the other half! I'll keep my eyes open for the Grace Hopper book.

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  179. Thanks for an insider's look at the publishing process, Meredith! I can't wait to read the PB biographies you included.

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  180. Thank you very much, Meredith, for the excellent advice and information!

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  181. I've read a few of these and will read the rest when they arrive on my library holds shelf. Your inside look is insightful. Thank you!

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  182. Great advice for all of us... and thank you for your insight into the process!

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  183. Great post! I enjoyed reading it. Thank you.

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