Tuesday, January 23, 2018

Where to begin?


I was stuck, like gum in my hair, kite in a tree, bumper to bumper traffic stuck.

The opening to a narrative nonfiction picture book biography I wrote lacked something.
So I turned to mentor texts for help. I read a dozen picture book narrative nonfiction biographies and paid special attention to the beginnings.

While reading the opening, I kept in mind advice from Oscar winning screenwriter Michael Arndt (Little Miss Sunshine, & Toy Story 3) in his Pixar video about beginnings. “Usually what you do when you’re introducing your main character is that you show them doing what they love most. But then your character needs one more thing. He needs a flaw. Now what’s key here is that the character’s flaw actually comes out of her grand passion.”

The mentor texts below show how Arndt’s advice is applied to picture books. The main character is introduced, the author shows what they loved…but… The character flaw in picture books is typically something the main character wants and whatever that is, it won't be easy to get. In this hero journey structure, the opening introduces the story. That said, illustrations also play a large role because they do a lot of the heavy lifting. Titles too. 

After reading each beginning I learned who the story was about, their conflict or something unique about the character that made me wonder. I wanted to turn the page to find out what happens next. Did the character get to do what they loved? How? Even though readers know the main characters in picture books do typically get what they want in the end, writers must hook them in the beginning.  And that starts with writing a stellar opening. 

Character & Setting

Well, of course I am partial to stories set in New Orleans. This beginning sets the tone not only about Mahalia, the main character, but draws us into her physical world. The lyrical language is lovely. Musical.
Mahalia Jackson: Walking with Kings and Queens, written by Nina Nolan, Illustrated by John Holyfield. Amistad



People might say little Mahalia Jackson was born with nothing, but she had something all right. A voice that was bigger than she was.

      It was New Orleans, and music was everywhere. Blues spilling through windows. Jazz pouring out doors.

     But it was gospel that Mahalia loved.

Character & Conflict with Society/Others

Early in the story we learn Tie Sing wants to fit in to the country he loves, but the society is filled with prejudice. The reader is rooting for him from the start.

Mountain Chef – How One Man Lost His Groceries, Changed His Plans, and Helped Cook Up the National Park Service, written by Annette May Pimentel, illustrated by Rich Lo. Charlesbridge Publishing

Tie Sing was a frontier baby, born high in the mountains in Virginia City, Nevada. Growing up, he breathed crisp Sierra air and scuffed through sagebrush. He learned to write in both English and Chinese.
     America was a tough place to be Chinese. Bosses paid Chinese workers less than white workers. Townsfolk spit out Chinese names like they’d swallowed river gravel. [text cont.]

Character and Conflict with Self

On the first page we learn a lot about Sandow, including who he became is not who he was at one time in his life. How did he change?

Strong as Sandow: How Eugen Sandow Became the Strongest Man on Earth, written & illustrated by Don Tate. Charlesbridge Publishing



In his day Eugen Sandow was known as “the Strongest Man on Earth.” He could break metal chains by expanding his broad chest. He could hoist a grand piano over his head. He boasted that he once wrestled a five-hundred-pound lion.

No doubt Eugen Sandow was the strongest of all strongmen.

But he wasn’t always strong.

Character & Conflict with Circumstances/Situation

Here, the reader feels William’s dreams will lead to something big despite his living conditions.

The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind, written by Kamkwanda and Bryan Mealer, illustrated by Elizabeth Zunon. Dial Books for Young Readers/ 



In a small village in Malawi, where people had no money for lights, nightfall came quickly and hurried poor farmers to bed. But for William, the darkness was best for dreaming. 

Now, about that ending...

38 comments:

  1. Great post, Keila! I love studying pb biographies.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Tina! So much learned from these great books.

      Delete
  2. I especially appreciated the way you classified these PB bio openings. This is post I'll refer to again. TY, Keila.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Welcome Kathy. So glad it's helpful. :)

      Delete
  3. Keila, I LOVE this post! Thanks for a great reminder about beginnings and how to write great ones.

    ReplyDelete
  4. This is a fantatastic post! Thank you so much for showing (and providing great examples) us about beginnings! I shall be looking and waiting for the endings post. :)

    ReplyDelete
  5. Thank you for sharing this very insightful post.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Great examples! Thank you Keila ❤️

    ReplyDelete
  7. It is so helpful to classify the types of conflicts we see in different PB bios. I will be bookmarking this.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Wow! What a fantastic post. It has me rethinking some of my current WIPs. Thanks so much!

    ReplyDelete
  9. Thanks, Keila! You've just cracked a story open for me. Cheers!

    ReplyDelete
  10. Thank you, Keila :) Your examples are gold!

    ReplyDelete
  11. Replies
    1. Thanks David. Great mentor text are so helpful.

      Delete
  12. This was excellent! Many thanks - struggling right now for a beginning.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh, I hope you get unstuck soon Linda.

      Delete
  13. This is extremely helpful. Thanks for your post, Keila!

    ReplyDelete
  14. What a great way to "show not tell" us about great beginnings. I'm sure I read this many times over.

    ReplyDelete
  15. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Thanks to you posting this I rewrote my opening. It's much better. Thanks, Keila. Loved the examples.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Thanks for including Mountain Chef in such great company!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You are welcome Annette. Stellar mentor text all around!

      Delete
  18. Thanks for this awesome post, Keila. The beginnings are so fabulous! Great choice of texts to share.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Welcome Carol. Thanks for stopping by.

      Delete
  19. You are quite the teacher. Such a detail resource you've given us. The manner in which you illustrated in your outline of openings, how critical the purposeful use of the right words to engage a reader can and must be in NF. Sooooo, will there be a post on endings? haha

    ReplyDelete