Friday, March 9, 2018

ReFoReMo Day 7: Editor Christina Pulles Clarifies Second Point of View

When I was a kid, one of my favorite picture books was If You Give a Mouse a Cookie by Laura Numeroff and Felicia Bond. As an adult and a children’s book editor who would love to acquire a book as successful as Mouse, I’ve often pondered what’s made it so successful. There’s that adorable mouse in overalls, of course, and something about the idea of cookies and milk is very comforting. But I think it’s more than that; I think it has a lot to do with the fact that the book is written in second person.
The second person point-of-view brings the reader right into the story. You’re a part of the action. You’re the one who’s given the mouse the cookie, and gets to watch everything that ensues! In a different way, second person can be perfect for giving instructions in a picture book, instructions which usually end up forming a story, too.  
It’s also not an easy POV to get right. I’ve read submissions written in second person and found the POV to be distracting. But when you do get it right, I think it makes for a very appealing read aloud. In fact, I’ve got two picture books coming out soon with second person points-of-view: If You’re Going to a March by Martha Freeman and Violet Kim and When Grandma Gives You a Lemon Tree by Jamie LB Deenihan and Lorraine Rocha—so it seems I’m on a quest to find my own Mouse.
Here’s a look at some other recently published favorites written in second person:
If You Plant a Seed by Kadir Nelson
-         Another fantastic cause-and-effect story, but without the silliness of Mouse. Second person doesn’t have to be silly!
Your Alien by Tammi Sauer and Goro Fujita and When a Dragon Moves In by Jodi Moore and Howard McWilliam
-    These two choose to tell a story in second person as if directing the reader’s imagination. What would happen if you made an alien friend? What would happen if a dragon moved into your sandcastle? 
How to Read a Story by Kate Messner and Mark Siegel
-        Instructions give way to sweet sentiments about the magic of reading in this wonderful example of a “How to” picture book.
Love by Matt de la Peña and Loren Long
-        With illustrations that are often drawn from the perspective of the viewer, this powerful book uses second person to deliver its moving message directly to the reader.


Talking directly to the reader may not be the right strategy for your story, but it never hurts to experiment. I hope these examples above help spark something for you!
Christina is giving away a critique of a picture book manuscript! To be eligible for prizes throughout the challenge, you must comment on each post, be registered, and consistently read picture books throughout the challenge.

Christina Pulles joined Sterling Children’s Books in June 2015, and before that worked at Simon & Schuster’s Simon Spotlight imprint. She loves working on everything from board books to fiction and nonfiction picture books to middle grade.











184 comments:

  1. I love books written in second person! They are so fun to read aloud. Thank you for sharing your great list of examples. I love so many of these books. I really enjoyed reading your post and hearing your perspective. Thank you.

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  2. I admit I've tried to write in second person and not done so well. But I certainly appreciate books that do it well. So far I've only read Tammi Sauer's Alien book which does it so well and incorporates humor and heart. The other books aren't so readily available in Australia. But our library is getting in LOVE so am looking forward to reading that.

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  3. I enjoy writing in second person, but I don't do it often. It's strangely freeing and playful, so perhaps I should do it more.....I love When a Dragon Moves In. The layer of subtext about who the "real" dragon is adds so much to the story.

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  4. Great post. Thanks for showing us some of the ways that second person POV can be done well. I love all of these books and am looking forward to the release of If Your Going To A March.

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  5. Such fun, creative books! Always exciting to play with perspectives when crafting a story. Thanks for the spark!

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  6. This POV is one I haven't tried yet, but I can definitely see the appeal. I think I'll give it a try with an idea I've been working on and see where it goes.

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  7. Second person point of view is fun! I loved When a Dragon Moves In, Love, and How to Read a Story. Your Alien is especially touching. I felt a somewhat disturbed by If You Plant a Seed. When second person works, I think it’s because it touches on universal truths and feelings - a great thing to work for.

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  8. Second person POV books are so fun to read. You have mentioned reading submissions in which that voice was distracting. Can you say more about that? How can writers avoid this pitfall?

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  9. I've never attempted second person, but with these wonderful examples, I may just do so. Thanks so much, Christina!

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  10. If You Give A Mouse A Cookie is still a favorite. Thanks for your post, Christina. Time to study these mentors and try writing a fun PB in second person.

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  11. Thanks for recommending these books that do second person POV well. I look forward to reading and studying them. Good luck on your quest for your own MOUSE.

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  12. Hi Christina, thanks for this inspiring post. I've hit a snag with a pb I'm working on...who knows, maybe 2nd POV will be just right for it. Can't wait to read these titles. I must confess, I've never read IF YOU GIVE A MOUSE A COOKIE, but it's on my list now, for sure.

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  13. Second person is so unique and always amazing when done right -- "The Iridescence of Birds" written by Patricia MacLachlan (illus Hadley Hooper) is one of my favorites. Thanks, Christina!

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  14. A wonderful selection of books to illustrate the genre! Thank you for sharing your thoughts!

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  15. if is important ti knoe the rules before you break them. thank you for this selection of titles. I think the artwork of If You Plant A Seed is frameable.

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  16. I have never attempted writing in second person but I do enjoy reading stories in second person. I read "When a Dragon moves in" last night and found it delightful. I can't wait to read the other selections.
    Thank you for the amazing post.

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  17. I like the immediate connection these books establish with readers. It’s no wonder that two of the books from today’s list overlap with the “HOW-TO” list: HOW TO READ A STORY and IF YOU PLANT A SEED. I think that direct address naturally has an instructional feel.

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  18. You got some great examples there. I love reading and writing second person POV stories, but I agree they’re not easy to get right. Thanks for sharing your insights, Christina.

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  19. Thanks for the great post. I really liked IF YOU PLANT A SEED and certainly agree second person brings the reader right into the heart of the story. I plan to experiment with it more after reading your post.

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  20. This point of view is certainly entertaining. Love reading 2 POV. It doesn't look as easy to write though. So...now I have to try it!

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  21. I, too love the immediacy of second point of view. Thank you for pulling together some wonderful examples. Carole Calladine

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  22. I'm with you in that If You Give a Mouse a Cookie was my favorite book to read to my kids. Can't wait to read your new books coming out!

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  23. Second POV certainly is engaging for the reader and in your alien you certainly empathize with the little alien missing his parents and I think that's important for kids to recognize that it isn't just about them-all the time. I also really want to know what's in the last box in the T-Rex book-I was hoping it would be on an end page but alas, no such luck.
    Thanks so much for your post!

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  24. Rebecca LevingtonMarch 9, 2018 at 8:55 AM

    I've never considered writing in 2nd person, but now I just might give it a try. Thank you for all these great reads and for participating in ReFoReMo!

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  25. These texts are great examples of writing in 2nd person. I have a couple of MS that I'm trying out in 2nd person POV, so I'll use these as mentor texts, for sure.

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  26. Thank you for this post! Great mentor texts and I love having a new way to consider them. I really loved “If you Plant a Seed”, and as an illustrator I noticed that the worm’s eye view that Kadir Nelson used also drew the viewer in. The first thing I noticed was that I felt like I was there with the rabbit and mouse, not just observing them. Perhaps this does even more to emphasize the great message that we should all be planting seeds of kindness.

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  27. I have not tried second person point of view yet. But I will, maybe that is what the story needs. Thanks for the post. Love the examples too.

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  28. I don't think I have a 2nd person manuscript. it will be fun to go through my stories to see if any of them are possible candidates.

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  29. I haven’t tried this POV before, this will be fun to play with. Thx for the great examples!

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  30. I absolutely love how engaging books written in 2nd POV can be–especially when read aloud. Thanks for sharing your thoughts, Christina.

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  31. I’ve found that I particularly like humorous books written in second person POV, although I do like Love by Matt De La Pena. On Day 2 we read Escargot by Dashka Slater and that’s another great example. I’m still working on getting second person POV to work out right so it was great to read all of these for inspiration.

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  32. Thank you so much for the great examples!

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  33. This is great! Lots to learn. Thank you.

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  34. Ty, Christina. I frequently change my POV from 1st to 3rd, but have not tried 2nd person!

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  35. Thanks for your great list of books written in second person and explaining how to do it well. I loved If You Plant A Seed - for the gorgeous illustrations as well as the simple, timely message... I can't wait for If You’re Going to a March!

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  36. Thanks Christina. This is a great list and I'm looking forward to your two new books as well! Second person is a very fun POV.

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  37. Loved When a Dragon Moves In and can't wait to read the others.

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    1. Each of these wonderful titles in second person POV effectively demonstrates how this voice can work well ... each with its different focus. I love how this voice creates a warm connection with children, whether the book is silly or warm and hopeful, as in LOVE and If You Plant A Seed. Becky Loescher

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  39. Thanks for this follow up post. I haven't read Love yet, but I have it on hold and can't wait to see how it too tackles the 2nd person POV.

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  40. I've never been a fan of writing in 2nd POV. But I enjoyed reading LOVE.

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  41. I'd love to try my hand at 2nd person. Thanks for the great titles!

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  42. Thank you for explaining 2nd point-of-view.

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  43. Love this post...thanks for sharing!

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  44. Love books written in 2nd person POV! Your Alien is one of my all-time favorites! Thanks for the nice post and for pointing out all the things that 2nd person POV can do for your story!

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  45. Love the way second person pulls the reader in. Great selection of books to study...thank you!

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  46. I never considered writing in 2nd person voice, but I will now. Thanks for highlighting its usefulness.

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  47. I’ve written a NF MG in second person POV but I’ve never really considered it with picture books. Thank you for sparking some ideas Christina!

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  48. I have been tempted to write in second person POV since it's so rare. This inspires me to try it!

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  49. Thanks for sharing! Second POV has always intrigued me and I'm thrilled to have a group of mentor texts to read together this in mind.

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  50. I've been noticing how second person POV can be useful in nonfiction PBs, like "Tiny Creatures" by Nicola Davies, for the reason Christina shares: it connects the child reader right to the text.

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  51. Very insightful post. Love and If you plant a seed are some of my favorites for being brilliantly executed and Your alien is one of my daughter's favorites. She picked it for me to read for her class. Thanks!

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  52. Thank you! Just in time for my next project.

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  53. I really like you selection of 2nd person POV books! I will watch for your two new books! Thanks.

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  54. I love 2nd person POV. Thanks for these suggested reads!

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  55. Thanks for the varied selection of books for 2nd person POV.

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  56. I love how 2nd person POV really brings the reader into the story. I can see kids wondering what they would do as I read these books. Thanks for a great post, I may have to give this a try!

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  57. I have not tried this POV, but you've shown some wonderful mentor texts to highlight this. Thank you.

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  58. Thank you, Christina, for the examples of second POV. I'm enjoying the titles mentioned and will seek others.

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  59. I've never considered writing in second person POV. I will reread these book choices and some others and try to see what the secret is and try one. I have been on a How to book search.

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  60. I love the ideas and points you highlight in your post. Thank you!
    Jenna Feldman

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  61. Prior to your post, I don't know that I would have tried my hand at this POV but these mentor texts and your comments have me inspired! I like the idea of engaging the reader in the middle of a scenario in this manner. Thank you for your insight!

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  62. It's fascinating to hear your perspective, Christina! I haven't tried writing a manuscript in this POV before but now I'm inspired to give it a go. Thanks for the interesting/intriguing mentor book selection. I've read some of the books but not all. I just requested the ones I haven't from the library!

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  63. Loved all of these selections. It is fun to see such different examples in this POV. It looks like you have inspired alot of us! Well done. It will be fun to see what becomes of this.

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  64. Great selection of books! I fell in love with If You Plant a Seed, and had great fun reading about the dragons that lurk in sandcastles. I, too, am a great fan of If You Give a Mouse a Cookie.

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  65. Loved these examples- might challenge myself to try using this POV now.

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  66. When I taught students who were struggling with reading, I discovered that they often were more interested in books told from 2nd POV. If You Give Your Mouse a Cookie was a favorite and often used by my fellow teachers as a mentor text to encourage students to write their own stories from this POV. Thank you, Christina, for introducing me to some other wonderful books with the 2nd POV to share with my family and friends who are teachers, parents, and grandparents.

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  67. Thanks for the great article. I have yet to write in 2nd POV, but admire many of the books that utilize it.

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  68. I have not tried writing in this POV. However I enjoyed all the books that were on today's list!

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  69. Thank you Christina! I have been writing a lot of nonfiction, and it often seems that using the second person is a great way to draw the reader in, and get him/her to really care about my topic.

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  70. Thank you for sharing these books and showing how second person POV can be successfully written.

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  71. Second person point of view books have been some of my favorites! Thanks for sharing with us!

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  72. Your thoughts about writing in 2nd POV are excellent, Christina. Thank you for introducing me to a few new titles.
    Suzy Leopold

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  73. Anyone seen books with Second POV with illustrations through the readers perspective--as if the reader is "in" the book, but can only, for instance, see their toes and what the story is conveying?

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  74. Thank you so much for your comments and sharing about 2nd person. I've not written anything in it, but I didn't realize there was a trick to it. Thank you for the information. I loved "When You Plant" but have yet to receive the others through ILL. Looking forward to reading them!

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  75. I’ll have to try 2nd person POV with a story that’s not working well.

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  76. Alice Carty FulgioneMarch 9, 2018 at 2:56 PM

    I have not tried writing in 2nd person POV but thank you for showing us how this POV can and has been done successfully. I especially loved Your Alien" & "When A Dragon Moves In".

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  77. Thank you for these fun text selections and your helpful comments on each one.
    It's funny that you mentioned If You Give a Mouse a Cookie as a favorite. That's one of mine also, and the text came back to me just this morning. In my kitchen, I had to get out a large baking sheet and while pulling it out, I knocked over the spice rack. While cleaning the spilled spices off the floor, I noticed the corners of the pantry needed to be scrubbed... The Mouse story lends itself to so many of life's little event chains. Wonderful! :0)

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  78. Reading a piece written well from a 2nd person point of view creates a real sense of being a participant in the story. For me as a reader, it can feel almost intrusive sometimes, an in-your-personal-space feeling, and it is irresistible! Writing well from that POV is a welcome challenge. Thank you!

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  80. Thank you, Christina...these are fun examples!

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  81. Interesting skill. Great post. And super titles!
    I found a fabulous video on YouTube of Matt de la Pena reading LOVE. Its was beautiful. I really liked the importance of highlighting self-love. Valuable lesson for kids.
    I also liked If You Plant A Seed for this reason. You reap what you sow, so to speak.
    I, like others, loved the imaginary friend aspect in When A Dragon Moves In. The second person POV worked great here.
    Thanks Christina!

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  82. I haven't really tried 2nd person POV in any of my picture book texts. It is really hard (at least for me) to get right. But the mentor texts are so fun and they have inspired me to give it a whirl! thank you.

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  83. I find second person POV books fascinating! Thanks for sharing, Christina!

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  84. Tammi Sauer certainly has a knack for those 2nd person POV stories. CARING FOR YOUR LION is another great one and it has a unique 'instructional' delivery.

    Thanks for this great list!

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  85. I’m looking forward to reading these second person POV stories. Thank you for giving us such great mentor texts. I may challenge myself to write a story in second person.

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  86. I've not tried writing in second person POV. Thank you for the mentor text suggestions, Christina

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  87. I have always been told to steer away from 2nd Person because it is so hard, but now I think I will give it a try.

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  88. I really enjoy reading books that are both 2POV and "how to" without being an IKEA-ean manual! I especially enjoy "Dragon" & "Plant Seed" in the above selection. (And I'm looking forward to your "Lemon Tree" book as we just gave our family g'ma a lemon tree--so now what?! :)

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  89. Second person POV is the best! Until this post, I never realized how much those stories draw me in. I definitely want to give it a try, but I can see already that it will take practice and patience to do it well.

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  90. These types of books are definitely some of the most memorable! The books on your list are terrific examples, I've enjoyed them all. Thanks for the great post!

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  91. Great examples of 2nd person POV. You're right, it's not easy to do but so personal!

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  92. Just recently read WHEN A DRAGON MOVES IN, AGAIN. And it is brilliant. Love that point of view. Thanks for your generosity in offering a critique!

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  93. I am also working on a manuscript with 2nd person POV and this has definitely given me points to think about. Thank you for providing such diverse examples that clearly show how 2nd person can be effective from How To books (How To Read a Story), to silly commentaries (When A Dragon Moves In) to serious touching subjects (Love). These are all fantastic examples. I think my favourite is Your Alien - very cute story and it makes me feel for the character and wonder what it would truly be like to have a little alien appear. Thanks for the great post!

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  94. THANK YOU for opening up SO MANY new storytelling possibilities. I am SO
    EXCITED to try the 2nd person storytelling POV. THANK YOU SO MUCH!

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  95. You are right that it is not easy to write in this POV. But those who have been successful really have something engaging.

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  96. What an honor to be included in this lovely post, and among some of my absolute favorites! Thank you so much! Hugs, Jodi :) xoxo

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  97. Thanks for the terrific examples of picture books written in second person. I need to try my hand at writng with this point of view. Sounds like fun!

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  98. Great examples for a really important concept. Still waiting for Love (incredibly backlog at the library for that one). Really enjoyed When a Dragon Moves In. Thanks!

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  99. I've not tried second person. But I have a story in revision that I think could work much better with this POV. Thanks for the inspiration!

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  100. When You Give A Mouse A Cookie has always been a favorite of mine, too. Have tried many of my own variations and with these new mentor texts, may take heart and try again! Thanks, Christina.

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  101. I'm not a big fan of second-person POV, because to my ear the narrators often sound alike. But some writers, such as Laura Numeroff, do a great job with it.

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  102. Thank you for this post and great book list! I enjoy the playfulness of many books written in second person POV and the way they often empower the young reader to realize that he/she can solve the story's problem (or even know something the narrator doesn't, like in the classic THE MONSTER AT THE END OF THIS BOOK).

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  103. Thank you for the excellent 2nd POV mentor texts, Christina. This was one of the ReFoReMo posts I was excitedly awaiting and am not disappointed. CARING FOR YOUR LION by Tammi Sauer and Troy Cummings, published by Sterling is another great mentor text for 2nd POV. Looking forward to reading the two new 2nd POV books you have coming out.

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  104. IF YOU GIVE A MOUSE A COOKIE is one of my favorites too! Thanks for the great post and insight.

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  105. Thank you for the variety of books written in second POV. I've been waiting to read Matt de la Pena's Love and this was a great excuse to go ahead and order it from the library. Love and If You Plant a Seed are two touching examples of this viewpoint. I loved Your Alien, too!

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  106. I've been toying around with writing a draft in 2nd person POV. Looks like it's time to put my plans into action!

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  107. I loved, loved, loved both IF YOU PLANT A SEED and HOW TO READ A STORY!!!

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  108. If You Give a Mouse a Cookie is STILL one of my favorites!

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  109. Thank you so much for the information on writing in second person. I have read a couple of the books you mentioned and can see that writing in second person is not easy, but it can be effective. I look forward to reading your two new books.

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  110. 2nd person POV really does pull in the reader, and there definitely is an art to doing it well!! These are excellent examples of how to do it right. Thank you, Christina, for putting these together for us, and offering your thoughts on them!

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  111. Thank you for this post about the various formats that 2nd person can take!

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  112. Another book that uses second person in a really interesting way is The Iridescence of Birds by Patricia MacLachlan, which inspired a recent draft of mine. It's a great way to develop empathy.

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  113. Thanks, Christina, for the editor's view on important features of second person POV and books that illustrate them perfectly.

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  114. Thanks for sharing your insights and mentor texts for second person POV!!

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  115. I love 2nd person POV. I worry about the distraction you mentioned. How do we watch for that? Thanks!

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  116. Thank you for suggesting the second person POV. I'm going to read these selections and then refer back to my Storystorm ideas and see if I can bring any of them to life. Thank you again!

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  117. Thanks Christina! I cannot wait for the book "When Grandma Gives You a Lemon Tree"!

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  118. Thanks so much for these examples, Christina. I do enjoy reading second person POV. I have to look some of these up!

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  119. Thank you, Christina. I'm working on one of these right now so this was a perfect post. On another note, your list--while wonderful--is 66% male and 33% female in an industry where the actual demographics are the opposite. (All those male illustrators!) Kindly making you aware in case you want to think about this when you make lists in the future. Thanks again!

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  120. I'm catching up, so I had just read all the how-to books, which, I think, all fall in the 2nd person POV category, too. Your Alien struck me as E.T. in a picture book - I may need to try brainstorming ideas where blockbuster movies are made into picture books, now. When a Dragon Moves In was really fun. Thanks!

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  121. Thank you, Christina. Beautiful books to read and study for the second-point-of-view. I find that voice has a lovely rhythm and evocative feel to it.

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  122. Thank you. Your post is insightful and has given me a steer to look at one WIP and to reconsider POV.

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  123. Yes, second person is fun! The trick is to do it well. Thank you for the great reading selections!

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  124. Thanks for your post. I love how books written in second person point-of-view can pull readers into the story. The books you listed are all great examples of this.

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  125. Thank you for this post and your advice!!

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  126. Experimenting with 2nd Person POV for manuscript drafting is fun and revealing even if you don't keep the 2nd Person POV. Great mentor texts. Thanks.

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  127. I have often wondered about the success of If You Give a Mouse a Cookie and always assumed it had to do with that cute mouse and the cause and effect that so many elementary school teachers are looking for a good read aloud to discuss. I had never considered the POV but I’m inspired now. Thank you.

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  128. Man, I've got to catch up! I made the mistake of opening an MG, and now it's keeping me from my mentor text reading. But I will, I promise!

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  129. Thanks for your post. I really enjoy reading books in the second person POV--especially the silly ones--but haven't tried it yet in my own writing. Thanks for the inspiration!

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  130. I love reading books written in second person point-of-view but rarely use it myself. I plan to try it more often. Thanks for the inspiration!

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  131. I so enjoyed the clever humor and sweet moments of these books. I've not tried writing in second person and admire the execution of it in the texts. Thank you!

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  132. I've noticed that my kids gravitate toward books written in second person POV. I'd like to give it a try. Thanks for the fabulous list of mentor texts.

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  133. My latest project is in 2nd person POV. Thanks for the great list of potential mentor texts!

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  134. My kindergartners love 2nd person pov. Looking forward to reading all these books. Thank you!

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  135. I've never tried second person, for the same reason mentioned-I feel that it can sometimes be distracting. These books do it well, however. I think IF YOU PLANT A SEED is such a wonderful 2nd POV book that uses the seed symbol so wonderfully-literally and figuratively.

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  136. I hadn't seen some of these before - thanks for introducing me!

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  137. I love 2nd person pov. I'll look for these books!

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  138. 2nd person makes sense with all these stories. I can see where it pulls readers in...now to be brave and try it out on my how-to story...Fingers crossed!

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  139. Some books feel too derivative of If You Give a Mouse...to me, but as a whole, I'm a fan of second person POV. I just experimented with it recently in my own writing for the first time!

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  140. I want to learn more about writing in second person. I read Matt de la Peña's book, Love, and it's inspiring; left me thinking about love! What a great consequence of reading a book!

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  141. When you know how to use 2nd Person POV, then you know how to make your audience relate! You know?! More seriously, this post hit home to me personally, as I used to consider 2nd Person POV out of the realm of possibility for my PB manuscripts. Until... a story rushed out of me at such a fast pace that I could barely capture it all. It was in rhyme (a first for me) and 2nd Person (another first for me). It required only minor tweaks based on feedback from my critique group partners and was received so positively that I'll soon start pitching the manuscript out into the world. Dare to be different! Many thanks for sharing this helpful reminder!

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  142. Thank you, Christina, for these excellent mentor texts. They demonstrate that it takes the right story idea to start with - as with most things - and careful attention to crafting it well!

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  143. Thank you for your excellent examples of books written in second person they are refreshing.

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  144. Great post on Second POV. I agree, when they are done right, they bring us right into the moment. I love If You Plant a Seed!

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  145. I need to check these books out. I've written a manuscript like this and it needs a little more editing.

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  146. Thanks for the second person POV. Great examples.

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  147. This is a great reminder. Thank you!

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  148. Great explanation of second person POV and the fact it's not that easy! I find second person POV intriguing but also difficult. This was a learning experience for me! Thanks, Christina!

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  149. Arin Wensley,
    Thank you for sharing these wonderful books, that show second person POV can be done.

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  150. I've always loved stories written in second person. It's as if the characters are speaking solely to me. After reading your post and taking the time to read and study the examples, I just may try my hand at writing one of my manuscripts in 2nd POV. :) Thank you!

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  151. Thank you for the great post, Christina.

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  152. I love, love, love second POV. Did I say love?

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  153. Love the way second person pulls the reader in. Thanks for highlighting its usefulness.

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  154. Christina - Thanks for a great post! Second person POV is indeed hard to pull off but I love finding excellent examples that highlight how readers can be part of the action!

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  155. Great post! I love studying how POV changes a story.

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  156. Interesting. Second person POV isn't very common but these are a very strong set. Thank you for sharing!

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  157. I love how successful these 2nd person books are. I especially enjoyed Your Alien.

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  158. Second POV is one I have not tried, but have an idea for. thanks for the reminder!

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  159. I think the other reason Mouse was so successful is that the 2nd person POV expertly addresses two audiences directly and simultaneously. Kids were drawn into the fantasy of hosting a mouse, and parents identified with the consequences of an exponentially messy cookie customer.

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  160. I am excited to try my own draft in this style. Thank you for the great selection of mentor texts.

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  161. I feel ready to tackle this POV! Thank you for the suggested mentor texts. I have discovered a few favorite with When A Dragon Moves In.

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  162. It is fun to find something written in second person. I wonder if 2nd person is actually more common than pb in first person?

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  163. It does seem to pull the reader into the story. Thanks for the suggestions. I love When A Dragon Moves In!

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  164. I love this POV. I'd add titles by Michelle Robinson and Jill Esbaum's If a T. Rex Crashes Your Birthday Party. Looking forward to seeing your titles, too.

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  165. Love seeing good examples of a POV that's tricky to pull off! Kids love that immediacy of being part of the story from the beginning.

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  166. I think writing in this 2nd person POV is difficult, but when done right, seems so natural. It really engages the reader. I love If a T Rex Crashes Your birthday Party and If You Plant a Seed. Must for my library. I'm inspired to try this POV. Thanks. Great post!

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  167. Love it! Great post! I’m going to experiment with 2nd person. Very good points on bringing the reader in. Thank you!

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  168. I have a rough draft of a story that is leaning to 2nd person POV, so I'm interested in seeing if that's the way it should go. Thanks for this.

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  169. Great post and am considering 2nd person for a WIP. Thank you!

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  170. I've always been drawn to 2nd person. I guess it just seems like there's a special connection between the author and the reader. My daughter and I have read, "When a Dragon Moves In" multiple times over the last few days, and it seems to have more of an impact on us each time we read it. I love books like that.

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  171. I have an "old" manuscript that is stewing. I'll stir it with second person POV and see if I can improve it. Thank you so much for sharing this.

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  172. This is a fantastic mentor text book list, thank you! And the second person POV ... definitely something to think more on.

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  174. You're right, it would be good to experiment with different points of view. That's what a story is after all, a narrative from someone's point of view, usually a character or an omniscient narrator. I don't often think to write in second person, but that's what makes these books more unique, almost like taking a photo from a ladder or the floor rather than eye level. I loved the boy's realization of the importance of family in the end of Your Alien. The author managed to convey a powerful message through second person, all while maintaining a humorous plot. I appreciated When a Dragon Moves In because the author/illustrator made it ambiguous as to whether there was really a reckless dragon or it was just the boy's imagination and bad behavior. Love was great because of certain gems in the text, like, "Your loved ones will stand there like puddles beneath their umbrellas, holding you tight and kissing you and wishing you luck." What a beautiful line that just makes you feel loved by reading it. Second person could be a powerful tool in my writing.

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  175. I especially liked Your Alien and When a Dragon Moves In. They are so relatable!

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  176. Thank you for sharing your perspective on Second Point of View via the list you shared.

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  177. Thanks for this list - I've been meaning to read some more second person POV books.

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  178. LOVE finally came in at the library. This is a great list of books written in second person. Another avenue to explore with your encouraging tips in mind. Thank you.

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  179. An excellent selection of mentor texts for that second person POV. I have a few How to manuscripts tucked away who could use these big brothers to look up to.

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  180. I've been too hesitant to try second person POV - maybe it's time to explore outside my comfort zone!

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  181. This was an incredibly helpful post! Thank you!

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