Thursday, March 19, 2020

ReFoReMo Day 14: Author/Illustrator Sarah Lynne Reul Explores Hybrids


My kids can’t get enough of graphic novels! Luckily for us, more and more keep magically appearing each time we visit the library. I’ve been thinking about the visual language of graphic novels while developing some new picture book ideas, so my ReForReMo list contains some magnificent examples of the picture book/graphic novel combo book.

The books below either have a hardcover, larger picture-book-like format or a simpler illustration style that feels close to the picture book aesthetic. However, they also all use graphic novel conventions* to communicate their stories through visuals, layouts & text.

If you’d like some more background on the language of graphic novels, this PDF from Penguin Random House has some of the basics, and also includes links to more resources.

Picture Book/Graphic Novel Hybrids

Colette’s Lost Pet  by Isabelle Arsenault; 48 pages


Stop That Yawn  by Caron Levis and LeUyen Pham; 40 pages






Where’s Halmoni? by Julie Kim; 96 pages


Lyric McKerrigan, Secret Librarian by Jacob Sager Weinstein and Vera Brosgol; 40 pages






Narwhal's Otter Friend from the Narwhal & Jelly series by Ben Clanton; 64 pages










Have you come across other picture book/graphic novel hybrids recently? 


Sarah is giving away a copy of her upcoming book, NERP! To be eligible for prizes throughout the challenge, you must be registered by March 2, comment on each post, consistently read mentor texts, and enter the Rafflecopter drawing at the conclusion of ReFoReMo.





Sarah Lynne Reul is an author, illustrator and award-winning animator who likes bright colors, tiny things and drawing on photos.  Her books include THE BREAKING NEWS, ALLIE ALL ALONG, PET THE PETS, FARM THE FARM and NERP!. Find more fun stuff at www.reuler.com or on Instagram @thereul.  

103 comments:

  1. Sarah, the cover of NERP! is adorable and I can't wait to read it Congrats. I think Ben Clanton's books are ingenious. I got a kick out of Lyric McKerrigan. Thank you so much for the link to the PDF.

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  2. Sarah, such fun books! I will look for your hybrid books. Thanks for the pdf. Stay well.

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  3. Hi Sarah, thank you. I am a volunteer librarian at a primary school and we have just opened a whole graphic novel section. These are great suggestions and the pdf will be really useful. Love the cover of your book!

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  4. Thank you for this list of books. I am always fascinated by the graphic novel format and look forward to reading how that is melded with picture books in these examples.

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  5. Such great hybrids to help develop visual literacy! Thank you, Sarah.

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  6. Thank you, Sarah! I am intrigued by these hybrid books. Nerp! looks like a fun book that I'm looking forward to reading.

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  7. Thanks for sharing, Sarah. I've read half the PBs on your list. Sadly, my library system closed yesterday. So, I returned a dozen books and left empty handed. I know that many can relate to my sinking feeling.

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  8. Sarah, I have been exploring the hybrid form, too. Kids love these and I appreciate the PDF. TY.

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  9. Great list -- I think maybe FRANK & BEAN might be a hybrid example - at the very least its hilarious!

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  10. These examples provide such a wide range, not just in length and intended age but also in the tone and mood. I love the punny jokes in Narwhal's Otter Friend just as much as I love raucous, bouncy feel of Stop that Yawn! and the themes of loneliness and friendship in Colette's Lost Pet. Today's post really shows just what a graphic novel could be.

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  11. Nerp is so cute! Thank you for your choice of books.

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  12. Don’t know much at all about these at all. I’m interested to find out more but will have to wait till the library opens again to read them. Thanks so much for your post. Your book looks adorable!

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  13. For someone who is not a huge fan of graphic novels it is always great to see a terrific selection that are doing something special. Thanks

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  14. I love the mix of graphic novel and picture book!

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  15. I applaud your creative combo approach. They are certainly eye-catchers. Thanks for sharing your mentor texts. I look forward to finding Nerp!

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  16. Earlier this school year, I had the opportunity to take my three grandsons (ages 9,7, & 4) to the library several times. It was during these visits that I discovered how much they liked to read or look at the illustrations of graphic novels. Sarah, your book looks like one they would be excited to read.
    I’ve noticed how they study the covers and skim through the books when making book selections. When libraries open again, I look forward to checking out these books. I did get to check out WHERE’S HALMONI before my library closed and hope to share it with my grandsons. They like to rate the books they read.

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  17. Thank you for these examples. I'm also going to check out the link you shared.

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  18. With a nephew who was a reluctant reader for so long, I love this type of reading for all ages. Thanks for the great list!

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  19. SARAH: I'm SO GLAD you brought this IMPORTANT topic up! Because of the way kids' brains have changed with technology usage (sci proven!), they are drawn more to the visual with LOTS going on. I know from personal experience by researching LIKE CRAZY to find more visual books for my nephew who isn't drawn to reading, that we MUST know the audience we write for and meet them where they are. The book examples you provided will TRULY help in this process. THANK YOU!!! I CAN'T WAIT to read your "NERP"--TOO ADORABLE!!!

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  20. Sarah, thank you for sending the PDF about graphic novels. So many of my students love this format. I am getting used to it but it has never been my thing. These are great examples and I am noticing the panel approach more often in PBs.

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  21. Love these Sarah - lots for me to find and savor. I do find that I read GN's much more slowly and have to train my brain as to which panel comes 'next' in the story sequence. Rewiring!

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  22. Such fun books. The covers alone will draw even the most reluctant readers. Thanks for the suggestions.

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  23. Love your selection of graphic novels. They all sound interesting. Even adults like these. Great post, Sarah.

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  24. My two youngest boys love graphic novels. It's what gets them to read! Thank you for these recommendations.

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  25. Thank you for this interesting sample of pb/graphic novels that I was mostly not familiar with, and for the pdf. Seeing the covers together shows what a wide range of styles graphic novels embrace these days.

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  26. I thought it was interesting that Colette's Lost Pet was on the list. I didn't think to categorize it as a graphic novel style. Thanks for the list!

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  27. Thank you for your list of graphic novels!

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  28. Thank you for suggesting these. I found 4 of the 6. Can't wait to share them with my grand daughters. Collete is an interesting character.

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  29. Thanks for this list, Sarah--Stop That Yawn is adorable!

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  30. This is a new mix of genres that I haven't found yet. I wish libraries were still checking out books so I could study the books you listed today.

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  31. Sarah, I love the cover of your upcoming book! Adorable! Great list of books to ponder over.

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  32. Thank-you for this list of graphic novel-picture book hybrids. I work with struggling readers who can't handle small type in many graphic novels, so these books offer them words they can actually see with ease, words with lots of white space around them. And the stories are good. I think I'll order Where's Halmoni for my own library as it's typeface is quite easy to focus on and its illustrations are great.

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  33. Isabelle Arsenault's style is so distinct. I love her work. And Julie Kim's cover is so intriguing. I'm still trying to wrap my head around how a writer and illustrator work together to create a graphic novel. It seems like such a daunting task. The cover for your book is hilarious. Love the expression on the anteater-like monster's face!

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  34. I do love this format. Thanks for sharing there.

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  35. Thanks so much for posting this! I want to learn more about them and now I have a great list to delve into!

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  36. I love using GNs and almost wordless pbs in my ESL classroom. In pairs, students tell each other what's happening on each page or panel, and we focus more on speaking than reading. So engaging. Love these mentor texts you shared. Thanks!

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  37. I have fallen in love with Narwhal & Jelly! They're like longer Piggie & Elephant books :) I haven't intentionally come across any hybrids other than these, however I do know that Candace Fleming has one coming out soon. My question is, does the author write with such illustration design in mind, or has the illustrator taken the ball & run with it? Curious to hear how these books evolved.

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  38. Great explanation and examples of hybrid books.

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  39. Thanks for the list. Had never herd the term 'hybrid' books before.

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  40. I have many questions about these hybrid books, so I appreciated the links you provided. I need to become better informed. I am very curious about the interaction between the author and illustrator, if the books are not done by a single person. Thanks for the great examples.

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  41. Just realized I don’t think I have the NERP book. Darn!

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  42. oooh-interesting post! I haven't really done much reading and research into the hybrid type picture books. Thanks for sharing and opening me up to something new!

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  43. Graphic novels and stories are the only way I can get family to read. Just gave them White Bird.

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  44. Thanks for the list. I look forward to reading them and getting more familiar with this genre.

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  45. Thanks so much — this hybrid genre was one that I had not yet read, and I learned a lot. I also learned that it is impossible for me to read books about yawning without yawning!

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  46. Thanks so much. Now with this forced homeschooling, we will read these.

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  47. I loved these graphic novels! The yawning book was cute and of course right at the end I yawned. Loved it.

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  48. Thanks for a great post! Can't wait for NERP!!!

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  49. Thank you for the link, much appreciated

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  50. With graphic novels available for other age levels, I was happy to see a list using a combination of "layouts & text" as in Narwhal to reach another level of reader/interest. Thank you!

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  51. This is super interesting! Graphic novels are hot right now; in fact, I wrote a 32-page historical fiction graphic novel for an educational publisher and hope to do more in the future.

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  52. Hi, Sarah! Such a fun and varied list of hybrids. I especially loved COLETTE'S LOST PET and seeing how far her imagination would go. A big thank you for the PDF link. Downloaded and ready to study.

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  53. This is all new to me and I am excited to check these out, thanks!

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  54. Love all these graphic novels! Happy to see graphic novels becoming so popular these days.

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  55. Kids love this format. Thanks for sharing these examples, Sarah.

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  56. I am excited to learn more about graphic novels. It is a concept I have not fully understood. Seems to be a bridge beyond picture books. Thank you.

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  57. Thanks for the post about hybrids and the link. Colette's Lost Pet is a favorite of mine.

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  58. So interesting how these different formats can mash up together. Thanks for adding more great titles to my TBR list.

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  59. Very interesting post! Thanks for sharing about hybrids.

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  60. This seems like a new avenue to explore. Thanks for pointing us to some examples to study.

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  61. I have no experience with graphic novels so your list of mentor texts that incorporate elements of a graphic novels in picture book format is a nice blend. Thanks for this great post of hybrid blends, Sarah! [Posted by LouAnn Silva]

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  62. Love the hybrid concept. Thanks for the recommendations!

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  63. Thank you for this insight into graphic novels and PB hybrids. I didn't know much about them. Surprised by how long they can get, but they really, really capture your heart. Your work is great by the way, thank you for that inside view too...

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  64. I love the creative formats of these books!

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  65. Thank you for the nudge to investigate these. I haven't really looked at graphic novels, I suspect once I do I'll be hooked!

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  66. This books were exactly what I was looking for! I was wondering what PB/GN hybrids looked like. Thank you!

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  67. Glad to ;earn the term 'hybrid' in connection with this genre. I wish I had access to the Penguin Random House PDF when I was teaching fifth grade and graphic novels first became hot! Now grateful to have it as a resource as a kidlit writer. Thank you! Looking forward to picking up these 'on hold' mentor texts 'after the (library) crisis'.

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  68. Stop that Yawn and Lyric McKerrigan must find their way onto my bookshelves at school! Too much fun!I can see kids who "don't like to read" loving these!

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  69. sarah,
    i'm very interested in using the graphic novel form of illustrating in a MG novel so I'll check these out!
    Thanks

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  70. Thanks, Sarah, for showing us these other forms of picture books.

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  71. Thank you for sharing picture book/graphic novel hybrids. I look forward to checking out these books.

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  72. I have not seen these hybrid books. Thanks for the suggestions.
    -Ashley Congdon

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  73. Nerp is a super title. I look forward to reading this list of new to me books. Thank you for the link.

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  74. Great post, Sarah! Thank you for this list of graphic novel/picture book hybrids and the link to the PDF. This is a new genre for me to explore and they look like fun reads.

    I got a kick out of "Stop That Yawn" and it’s 50s/60s and 70s references… I am a Golden Oldies(50s & 60s) nut and recognized the first two immediately. “Hullabloo” was a 1965 NBC TV show similar to Shindig which was its competition and aired on ABC. “Rock Around the Clock” was a 1955 song by Bill Haley and the Comets and “What’s Up” is an expression like the 70’s “What’s Happening” that has replaced Hey or Hi.

    I can’t wait to read Nerp!!

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  75. I have to catch these yet. Thanks!

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  76. Thank you for this interesting post and great examples!

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  77. This was an interesting post on hybrids, Sarah. Thank you!

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  78. Interesting post, and thanks for sharing the graphic novel resources. I look forward to reading Nerp!

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  79. I've never written a graphic manuscript before. I know kids love them. Thanks for the examples.

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  80. I've been wondering if graphic novel elements would be a good addition to one of my manuscripts and am so appreciative of these mentor texts!

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  81. Thank you, Sarah! This post touches on things I have yet to explore with my own writing, but I find them very interesting. I LOVE the Narwhal books! :)

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  82. I love Stop that Yawn! Thanks for the mentor text list!

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  83. Sarah! These titles are all new to me. I look forward to reading your suggested list.

    Thank you for the PDF.

    Suzy Leopold

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  84. I'm looking forward to reading these titles. I've printed the PDF. Thank you for that.

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  85. Loving this hybrid concept and now have so many more questions about this format! Thanks for sharing these great mentor texts!

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  86. Thank you for this list. I look forward to checking out some of these books when my library re-opens...

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  87. An interesting exploration. Thank you.

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  88. Thank you for examples of stories using dialogue bubbles and illustrations!

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  89. Definitely looking forward to checking those out. Thanks for the link to the PDF!

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  90. Great range of examples. Loved Colette's Lost Pet and Where's Halmoni. Thanks!

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  91. Thank you. I've not been reading any graphic novels/picture books. I may soon begin.

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  92. Great books for transitional readers. It made me realize there are so many ways to tell a story.

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  93. I didn't know about this hybrid. I was only able to check out Colette's Lost Pet before the library closed. I look forward to checking out the others too. Thank you for the link to Penguin's pdf guide on graphic novels.

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  94. Ooh! So many great titles. Thank you for this list. We've also been looking at some Dan Santat books for that graphic novel/ PB feel.

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  95. Great list. I'll have to check them out.

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  96. This is a new world for me. Thanks for opening the door.

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  97. Thanks for these - this is a newer genre for me too. Loved Narwhal and Jelly!

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  98. My oldest daughter has recently gotten into this genre, so I appreciate the suggestions for new reading. Narwhal is a particular favorite of hers!

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  99. These are SO popular in the library!

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  100. The Narwhal books are favorites of mine. Thanks for sharing the link to the graphic novel information. I would love to try to write one.

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