Friday, March 6, 2020

ReFoReMo Day 5: Susannah Richards Shares Books that Capture an Audience


There is no formula and rarely is there only one solution to a problem or one way to meet a goal. When it comes to writing and illustrating picture books, there is definitely more than one way to create a book that resonates with current or future readers. The goal is to balance the needs of the story and the needs of the potential audience, both of which may be varied and unanticipated. The following picture books share little in common in terms of the structure, pacing, audience, relationship between words and images, but what they share in common is that they are all picture books that accomplish their goal-to capture an audience for a real or imagined story. 

The goal is to read widely because you can't always predict how reading will impact your writing.Barbara McClintock has created a large body of picture books and continues to push her boundaries as an illustrator and writer. In her latest picture book Vroom! she tells the story of Annie, a young race car driver, who is ready to go. With a strong balance between text and the face-paced images, she creates a geographic adventure that includes rural and urban landscapes This is a circular story (not as obvious as If You Give A Mouse a Cookie) where the text and the images race forward while pushing boundaries that settle in for comfort when you return home. Clearly, race car driving is for everyone.



In River, Elisha Cooper shares a more linear journey following a young woman as she paddles her canoe three hundred miles down the Hudson River from the Adirondacks to New York City. Cooper finds a balance that is both peaceful and adventurous. He keeps the reader turning the page wondering about the natural world that she encounters with rich descriptions–"Black flies circle her head and bite her ankles" and "High in the branches of a tree she sees a brambled nest, and down on the rocky shore, an eagle with a fish in its talons." Much like in Vroom!, readers will find themselves travelling through the story wondering about the world around them and then be happy to be home.
2020 Caldecott Honor book Going Down Home with Daddy by Kelly Starling Lyons, illustrated by Daniel Minter is a story of family, generations and traditions woven together. Lyons' text and Minter's illustrations show love and respect as readers wonder how Lil Alan will honor his granny. Lyons' text and Minter's illustrations stick closely to an honest story while still leaving room for dreaming about the next visit.
You don't have to tell the reader everything and you have to trust that the reader will figure it out. Jenn Bailey and Mika Song were clearly comfortable with inviting the reader to make their own conclusions in A Friend for Henry, a story about identity and looking for friendship in a common and familiar setting, the classroom. Henry sees the world very differently and in each scene, Henry takes an analytical and logical approach to explaining why others do what they do (sometimes breaking the rules). The book does not tell the reader that Henry may have behaviors on the Autism Spectrum and it does not matter if the reader realizes this in order for the story to resonate. 
             






Friendship and fear are universal and there are thousands of books with themes of friendship and/or fear. And still there are openings for titles that are charming, accessible, relatable, honest and perfectly paced in this 48-page picture book. Truman by Jean Reidy and Lucy Cummins pushes each of us to find own Truman inside and outside home. Sarah and Truman love, protect, and support each other even though Truman is a tortoise and Sarah, a girl about to go off to school. Universal experiences told well without fanfare and so much courage in both Sarah and Truman.

So often, small yet significant moments in history are overlooked in history lessons and yet, these stories are as essential as better-known stories. In A Ride to Remember: A Civil Rights Story, Sharon Langley and Amy Nathan with illustration by Floyd Cooper shares the moment when Sharon, an 11 month old, was the first person of color to ride a merry-go-round in Baltimore, Maryland on the same day that Martin Luther King, Jr. gave his I Have a Dream speech in Washington, DC. The 1st person narrative, it reminds readers that there are so many stories to be told and that is always pays to read the newspaper for the story that connects people.

           
In a very different kind of ride, Richard T. Morris and LeUyen Pham take readers on an action packed adventure in 2020 Caldecott Honor book Bear Came Along. This big adventure is piled up with emotional reactions and quite a bit of joy as a bear, froggy, raccoons, beaver, duck each find out something they did not know while taking a risk and reminding readers to carpe diem and trust that it will all work out. The text, framing and format of the images, and the character development keep this story bouncing along UNTIL the animals are all friends. The endpapers are an added bonus of storytelling.






Jen Bryant is a stellar picture book biographer and she has once again written a picture book where her text delivery matches the person in Feed Your Mind: A Story of August Wilson. Both a tribute to Wilson's legacy and a window into perseverance and creativity, both Bryant and debut illustrator Cannady Capman honor Wilson, detail his challenges and accomplishments in two acts, the first focusing on his childhood, love of reading and poetry and the second, focusing on his work as a playwright. Bryant and Chapman make this Pulitzer Prize winning playwright a mentor to a wider audience highlighting his talents and successes while being honest about the racial injustices he and his family experienced.
Rowboat Watkins manages to capture playfulness in every book he writes and illustrates (the clever Pete with No Pants) and Most Marshmallows is no exception. This book is about everyone, for everyone. It is impossible not to smile when you read it or even contemplate taking out the marshmallows and creating a story. It defies everything you think you know about how stories work but the delightful short lines and amazing marshmallow personalities leave readers with a squishy feeling and the power to believe that they can do anything. Every time you read it, you find some story telling that you missed the last time you read it. While this may not be just about marshmallows, readers will easily suspend any disbelief.


Like Watkins, Sergio Ruzzier understands how to play with words and images. Who says that you need a lot of words to make a picture book? Good Boy is childlike, child friendly and holds a child's attention. The entire book focuses on one or two word commands, some that may be expected and others that set the stage for friendship and adventure between a boy and a dog–Fetch. Jump. Roll over. Cook. Serve. Stay. Clean. Come. Pedal. Speak. Smile. Home. Stay. In recent titles, Ruzzier has demonstrated his exceptional ability to create early readers (Fox & Chick titles from Chronicle) that will be read over and over. He respects the reader but also pushes them to explore within and beyond the pages.
In a playful way, picture books can teach lifelong skills and the story may come from everyday life experiences. Money rarely makes an appearance in books for children and yet financial literacy is so important to success. Cinders McLeod's collection of Moneybunny (3 titles so far, but I think there was to be a 4th) follow bunny Sonny as he learns to Earn It, Save it and Spend It. In the most recent Spend It title, Sonny learns to make decisions since he wants to buy everything but everything may cost more than his 3 carrot weekly earnings. This financial literacy lesson is perfectly aimed at its audience with childlike energy and enthusiasm while teaching about purchasing power and the value of decision-making.

The picture book is a format for story delivery and like any format there are many different variables to navigate the path to your picture book may be an adventure that ends in a friendship within and beyond the pages. 

Happy world building, 32 pages at time (or in other multiples of 8, a lesson for another day).


Susannah is giving away a 15 minute consultation on an idea or unpublished manuscript or marketing ideas for published picture book to one lucky winner! To be eligible for prizes throughout the challenge, you must be registered by March 2, comment on each post, consistently read mentor texts, and enter the Rafflecopter drawing at the conclusion of ReFoReMo. 

Susannah Richards is an associate professor of education at Eastern Connecticut State University where she teaches courses in English Language Arts methods and Children's and Young Adult Literature. She was a member of the 2013 John Newbery Award Committee, 2017 Geisel Award Committee, the inaugural Anna Dewdney Read Together Award, the Excellence in Graphic Literature Award (Children's Fiction), and other awards committees. She is an active advocate for books for youth and those who create them. She is a frequent speaker at state, national and international conferences where she has moderated panels and conversations with Norton Juster, Sophie Blackall, Sean Qualls, Brian Floca, Kevin Henkes, Lesa Cline and James Ransome Candace Fleming, Eric Rohmann, Brian Lies, Laura Amy Schlitz, Sharon Creech, Vera Brosgol, Chris Van Allsburg, Hervé Tullet, Angela Dominguez, Melissa Sweet, Andrea Davis Pinkney, Jane Yolen, Katherine Applegate, Jason Chin, Ed Emberley and others. She coordinates many literature related events including the Rhode Island Festival of Children's Books and Authors, the Silent Art Auction at BEA, and almost always says yes to bookety, bookety related projects. Follow her on Twitter and Instagram @SussingOutBooks.


143 comments:

  1. What fun journeys and characters you’ve introduced! I found new favorite picture books on this list. Thank you.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I love how you managed to find journeys either personal or literal in most of these books. I look forward to really digging into their storytelling and construction today. Thank you.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Accomplishing a goal and a meaningful journey are the opposite sides of the same coin. Thank you for bringing these wonderful books to our attention.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I love your line 'balancing the needs of the story with the need of the audience'. Very inspiring books, thank you.

    ReplyDelete
  5. As an author illustrator I found this selection very interesting from the illustration point of view (different ways of illustrating journeys) as well as from the writing perpective. Thank you for an inspiring post!

    ReplyDelete
  6. Thank you for sharing these delightful journeys in picture book form. I look forward to reading them.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Thanks for sharing these stellar stories and what makes them so extra special, Susannah.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Susannah, Thanks for this rundown and what these books have in common. I've read quite a few already but need to examine them as true mentor texts now.

    ReplyDelete
  9. I love Truman. Thank you for sharing this great titles

    ReplyDelete
  10. Thanks, Susannah for sharing these books that capture us and take us on an adventure. Great and varied selection.

    ReplyDelete
  11. What an awesome list of mentor texts to study today. Thank you for sharing your insight!

    ReplyDelete
  12. I love discovering new mentor texts...and you've done that for me today. Thanks for a nice variety!

    ReplyDelete
  13. Thanks for sharing these inspiring titles. I always enjoy learning how authors create something fresh.

    ReplyDelete
  14. These books are so diverse, and I appreciate how you've described them and brought them to our attention.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Thank you for the great list of texts. I particularly love Bear Came Along.

    ReplyDelete
  16. I'm looking forward to diving into all these books and studying their uniqueness.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Susannah: What an INSPIRATION this post is! I ESPECIALLY APPRECIATE the perspective that "The goal is to balance the needs of the story and the needs of the potential audience, both of which may be varied and unanticipated." THANK YOU for sharing your wisdom and these WONDERFUL book examples; I CAN'T WAIT to dig into them today!!! THANK YOU!!!

    ReplyDelete
  18. I like the idea of "A Friend for Henry" and showing how he sees the world differently. Thank you for choosing this book as a study guide in writing and how we can let each person who reads our books come to their own conclusions

    ReplyDelete
  19. What a great post! I love how different each book is and now must add them to my classroom library. :D I am trying to practice the "less is more" theme!

    ReplyDelete
  20. Thank you for writing such enticing invitations to journey with a book!

    ReplyDelete
  21. I've read many of these wonderful books and look forward to visiting with them again. Thank you!

    ReplyDelete
  22. Thank you. Wonderful journeys.

    ReplyDelete
  23. Thank you for bringing these books to our attention and for the way you showed the uniqueness of each. I'm eager to read each of them.

    ReplyDelete
  24. Thanks for introducing these new books with different approaches.

    ReplyDelete
  25. What a great selection. Can’t wait till a couple of them are returned to my library!! Excellent that they are checked out since it means someone is enjoying quality kidlit. Thank you.

    ReplyDelete
  26. Thank you, Susannah! It always fun to see the diversity of children's literature today! Several of these are among my favorite and others I'm excited to read for the first time!

    ReplyDelete
  27. A great group of books from all different points of view and topics. Could only find 5 of them but they were new to me. Thanks for your gathering and showing us the importance of each.

    ReplyDelete
  28. So many good books on this list - makes me excited to grab the ones I have yet to read!

    ReplyDelete
  29. I really appreciate this post, Susannah! I sometimes get stuck on formula, so I like seeing all these different ideas for how to structure a story. I loved the language in River as well: "The forest is silent but for the thump of her heart and the flit-flit of the moose's ears."

    ReplyDelete
  30. Great recommendations. I especially LOVE "Most Marshmallows"! It is so clever and such a creative way to explore an evergreen theme.

    ReplyDelete
  31. Balancing the needs of the story and the needs of the potential audience is a great concept. Wonderful choice of books to discuss.

    ReplyDelete
  32. What a variety of books you've recommended! I've read Vroom! and Feed Your Mind, but I'm excited to check out the others.

    ReplyDelete
  33. Loved reading 'Truman'! Looking forward to reading more from this list!

    ReplyDelete
  34. Thank you, Susannah, for taking us on different journeys in each of these books. The mix of voice and structure in your mentor texts show there are many ways to meet the needs of our potential audiences.

    ReplyDelete
  35. Thank you for this helpful post! My little ones loved Vroom! And Truman is one of my favorites.

    ReplyDelete
  36. Thank you for sharing books that captivate an audience. I can't wait to read them.

    ReplyDelete
  37. What a great collection of mentor texts. I love your advice about finding the adventure in each book and "balancing the needs of the story with the need of the audience".

    ReplyDelete
  38. What an amazing group of books - looking forward to reading and learning from each. Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  39. Great post! Thanks for sharing such a wonderful list of books!

    ReplyDelete
  40. Thank you for your insight and for the list of some amazing books!

    ReplyDelete
  41. I'm headed to my library's website now and placing more books on hold, as many of the ones you have listed as they have copies of for some excellent weekend mentor text reading.

    ReplyDelete
  42. "...accomplish their goal-to capture an audience for a real or imagined story." Thank you, Susannah, for these excellent examples of books that do this.

    ReplyDelete
  43. Thanks you for introducing me to some really clever books!

    ReplyDelete
  44. Thank you, Susannah. Love the adventure and journey themes.

    ReplyDelete
  45. This is an interesting selection looking at authors delivering on readers needs, known and unanticipated.

    ReplyDelete
  46. Thank you for sharing this list of mentor texts with us!

    ReplyDelete
  47. Still waiting for a couple of these from the library. Most excited to read Most Marshmallows

    ReplyDelete
  48. This is quite a list, Susannah. So far, I have had the opportunity to read four of these beautiful books. I, like you, am intrigued by the way each author and illustrator took me on a special journey. I look forward to more adventures as I read and reread these books and other picture books recommended in the feedback to your wonderful post.

    ReplyDelete
  49. Thank for for this very thorough post and great list of books!

    ReplyDelete
  50. What a wonderful selection of books. Thanks

    ReplyDelete
  51. Great collection and such a variety. Loved them all!

    ReplyDelete
  52. Thank you for this wonderful post. There is an audience for anything.

    ReplyDelete
  53. Thank you so much for sharing so many wonderful books with us today. I cannot wait to curl up with my Day 5 stack of books this evening.

    ReplyDelete
  54. A stellar post, Susannah. I will be sure to have a close read of the books you shared. Thank you!

    ReplyDelete
  55. Oh, I loved Truman. Waiting for a few of these to come in on my holds list!

    ReplyDelete
  56. Never heard of Moneybunny. Thanks for the intro!

    ReplyDelete
  57. Truman was a fave for me too! Thanks for sharing this list!!

    ReplyDelete
  58. Thank you for presenting a very helpful topic and for sharing this outstanding list.

    ReplyDelete
  59. Thank you so much for sharing these books with us.

    ReplyDelete
  60. What a great post, Susannah. Each book is a standout but not in exactly the same way. Truman is one my all time faves and I must track down the others.

    ReplyDelete
  61. Thanks for an interesting, varied list of picture books. I look forward to reading them.

    ReplyDelete
  62. Love Truman! it's images - 'size of a small donut and every bit as sweet'; it's word choices - pensive & vast, uncharted, unsettling; it's emotion - be brave & 'he could wait no longer.'
    Love Bear Came Along - that waterfall! Oh, what a ride!
    So much to think about! Thanks.

    ReplyDelete
  63. Great selections!

    ReplyDelete
  64. Each of the stories here seems to be strongly character-driven, even when the character is a marshmallow! Really enjoyed this group of books.

    ReplyDelete
  65. Thank you for this post! It really got me thinking when you said: The goal is to balance the needs of the story and the needs of the potential audience, both of which may be varied and unanticipated."

    ReplyDelete
  66. Wonderful variety of journeys, and fun characters to ride along with. The very different approaches are all captivating- thanks for sharing!

    ReplyDelete
  67. Thank you, Susannah, for sharing an outstanding post filled with excellent titles and world building.

    Suzy Leopold

    ReplyDelete
  68. Each of the books you discussed spins a unique tale, and, as you point out, captures the audience in its own way. I Loved the lyrical language in Going Down Home With Daddy. Thanks for a great list on mentor texts!

    ReplyDelete
  69. Great series of books. I really like looking at the pacing for these. Thank you!

    ReplyDelete
  70. Bear Came Along is such a sweet and satisfying story and the art is so beautiful. I loved Spend It and how it teaches a lesson that doesn't feel lesson-y.

    ReplyDelete
  71. What wonderful mentor texts. Thank you for sharing them and for your insightful perspective on each. I loved both Vroom and A Friend for Henry - so different in tone, but I felt really drawn in by both, as did my 7 year old.

    ReplyDelete
  72. You say that "the goal is to balance the needs of the story and the needs of the potential audience, both of which may be varied and unanticipated." I really saw that happening while reading these varied books. In the author's note for 'Feed Your Mind A Story of August Wilson' I read "....It became apparent, as I immersed myself in these materials, the the full arc of his creative life might be too much for a picture book. I decided, therefore, to focus primarily on his early years...." Thank you for providing so many great mentor texts.

    ReplyDelete
  73. I love how you make us understand the power of a picture book in its ability to capture an audience. Thanks, Susannah, for this great post.

    ReplyDelete
  74. What a fun group of books. Can’t wait to get started reading them. Thanks

    ReplyDelete
  75. Capturing the audience's attention is so important now with electronics so easily available that take away everyone's attention. What will make the reader keep reading?
    -Ashley Congdon

    ReplyDelete
  76. They look good! Thanks for the introduction to these books.

    ReplyDelete
  77. Enjoyed the books for today, in particular, A Friend for Henry and Truman. Thank you!

    ReplyDelete
  78. Looking forward to journeying through these beautiful books. Thank you for your guidance.

    ReplyDelete
  79. I think your comment that really resonated for me was Jen Bryant's matching the text delivery to the person — and in the case of your list, to the story. It built on Heidi Stemple's post yesterday and changed the way I think about the text. Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  80. I really enjoyed learning from this stellar selection of books. "River" was so beautifully created that I picked up "Beach" by the same author. "A Friend for Henry" was so touching that I've read it to my pre-k kiddos, quite a few of which relate to Henry. And "Truman" was just so...so...cute & touching! I'll never forget a "turtle as tiny as a donut hole." That's great writing! :)

    ReplyDelete
  81. Thanks, Susannah, for giving us ways to examine our stories. One line stuck out, like others have mentioned: balancing the needs of the story with the needs of the potential audience. It leaves us with a lot to think about for our own stories.

    ReplyDelete
  82. Great post, Susannah! Thank you for showing us how “to balance the needs of the story and the needs of the potential audience.” What a terrific collection of mentor texts!

    I loved how “River” pulles you into the story. "Then the water deepens past mossy brown rocks. As she approaches one rock...the rock rises out of the river, water dripping off its back.”

    And Bear Came Along pulls the reader in from the very first sentence. “Once there was a river that flowed night and day, but it didn’t know it was a river...until... bear came along.”

    Am anxiously awaiting the mail as they should be here at the beginning of next week and I can add them to my growing collection. I have been doing ReFoReMo every year since 2015 and every year more and more books show up on my bookshelves.


    ReplyDelete
  83. these books and your analysis of them are fascination. I can't wait to read some of them.

    ReplyDelete
  84. Thanks for the great list! New favorites: A friend for Henry, Good Boy, Truman and Most Marshmallows :)

    ReplyDelete
  85. Such a terrific post, Susan! This list of mentor texts is fabulous!

    ReplyDelete
  86. Love the selection of journey books you chose for us! Great examples of differing approaches to life's adventures. My favorite is Most Marshmallows: So clever and relatable. Thank you, Susannah

    ReplyDelete
  87. Thank you! Definitely going to look for this in the books I read!

    ReplyDelete
  88. Thank you for this inspiring list!

    ReplyDelete
  89. Great post! Thanks for the wide array:)

    ReplyDelete
  90. So many adventure stories - each with their own unique style. Thanks for this list!

    ReplyDelete
  91. What a wonderful road map to all the journeys we can take with your selection of mentor texts. Thank you!

    ReplyDelete
  92. You've captured my interest with all these titles and mentor texts. Thank you for another reading adventure.

    ReplyDelete
  93. Very inspiring list. I love A Ride to Remember.

    ReplyDelete
  94. Wonderful list, love seeing A Ride to Remember a second time in ReFoReMo with a new way on how to use it as a mentor text.

    ReplyDelete
  95. So many books that captured my interest! Thank you for sharing. I like how Barbara McClintock used something she is passionate about to captivate young readers and broaden their world in "Vroom!".

    ReplyDelete
  96. What lovely selections, and what a variety! I'm excited to see A Ride to Remember on the list again. :) Thanks so much for sharing!

    ReplyDelete
  97. There are many books here I hadn't read, so thanks for the recommendations!

    ReplyDelete
  98. Great post! Thank you for this list and your perspective!

    ReplyDelete
  99. This is such a wonderful range of recommendations. I thoroughly enjoyed each one. I'm struck by how something so complex as managing money can be communicated so simply (and well).

    ReplyDelete
  100. You've pinpointed some of my favorite pbs. Thanks for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
  101. Thank you for this great list of books and your wonderful insights. Much appreciated!

    ReplyDelete
  102. What an interesting collection you've shared, Susannah! Thanks so much for highlighting some new-to-me recent mentor texts.

    ReplyDelete
  103. Love the mix of books here and just shows all the directions one can take their story.

    ReplyDelete
  104. Thanks for sharing these attention grabbing PBs! I need to check out Most Marshmallows.

    ReplyDelete
  105. The power of a picture book- such small stories that tell such big tales- this is truly why i love picture book reading and have such a respect for fellow authors who can create such genius.

    ReplyDelete
  106. Thanks for a wonderful post highlighting world building and excellent mentor texts!

    ReplyDelete
  107. Most of these titles were knew to me and I can't wait to explore them further!

    ReplyDelete
  108. Still chuckling about Most Marshmallows! Brilliant. Loved this grouping. Thanks for lifting them up.

    ReplyDelete
  109. Thank you so much for this lovely tour through some new favorites. I can certainly imagine these titles impacting my future work

    ReplyDelete
  110. What a fabulous collection of mentor texts! Thank you for highlighting them. I can't wait to jump into them and make my own work stronger.

    ReplyDelete
  111. love this list! To your point about how these all achieve their goals in different ways, sometimes I think it's interesting to take a successful story and think of another way to tell it that would also resonate with readers. A fun challenge. Thanks for your post!

    ReplyDelete
  112. Thank you for sharing a great selection of books

    ReplyDelete
  113. A lovely collection of picture books to serve as mentor texts. Thank you.

    ReplyDelete
  114. A really fun selection. Thank you!

    ReplyDelete
  115. These are all great examples - thank you for breaking them down for us.

    ReplyDelete
  116. Thanks you for these, especially Feed Your Mind. And Truman, and Vroom and River. Your choices touch my mind.

    ReplyDelete
  117. This is my favorite collection of mentor texts so far! Thank you for pulling them all together for us.

    ReplyDelete
  118. Thank you for these great selections and for your insight which will be helpful as I read them. I have a nearly wordless MS like GOOD BOY, and am very curious to see how the author handles this.

    ReplyDelete
  119. Thank you for highlighting this inspiring selection of books!

    ReplyDelete
  120. Thanks for this great list. The comments about each are very helpful.

    ReplyDelete
  121. I love the journeys readers can take in each of these books. Such wonderful selections and explanations.

    ReplyDelete
  122. I love that idea ~ capture your audience!

    ReplyDelete
  123. These are great books! I can't wait to read them all! Thanks for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
  124. Thank you Susannah for a great selection of titles! As a non-illustrator i am envious of those who can do both. I especially loved Truman and A Friend for Henry. I haven't yet read River but it sounds intriguing and i also look forward to reading A Ride to Remember in the near future.

    ReplyDelete
  125. I enjoyed a couple of the titles on this list, but can't wait to get the others. Love balance between sparse text and illustrations!

    ReplyDelete
  126. I'm thrilled to see so many titles that are new to me! These titles encourage the writer to break some rules!

    ReplyDelete
  127. It's amazing how captivating each of these books are! Really enjoyed this list!

    ReplyDelete
  128. Thank you, Susannah, for sharing these. I think Truman was my favorite.

    ReplyDelete
  129. Thanks for sharing this fabulous list and your insights, Susannah.

    ReplyDelete
  130. I find capturing the audience can be a murky business as a writer. I look forward to reading these examples. Thanks so much!

    ReplyDelete
  131. I enjoyed your insights into each of these books!

    ReplyDelete
  132. These books would inspire any ambitious writer. They achieve so much with their stories. A lot goes into writing, these authors make it look easy. A great selection of mentor texts to be sure.

    ReplyDelete
  133. Great collection of books! I also love your thoughts about each one. Thank you!

    ReplyDelete
  134. I read Truman. Thanks for sharing your view of this book and others.

    ReplyDelete
  135. Thank you so much for these title suggestions! As soon as we can make our way out into the world again, I plan on snagging most of these from the library!

    ReplyDelete
  136. Much appreciated insights on these books... especially about what is NOT said in A Friend for Henry

    ReplyDelete
  137. MOST MARSHMALLOWS was my favorite. Wow, I wish I had thought up that one!
    Thank you Susannah for your suggestions!

    ReplyDelete
  138. Recalling my own childhood pet turtle ('Theodore'), I loved TRUMAN!...and cannot wait to get my hands on the varied suggestions you've shared for more mentor text learning opportunities...Thanks for your insightful post, Susannah!

    ReplyDelete