Wednesday, March 17, 2021

ReFoReMo Day 13: Author Hayley Barrett Remembers the Finishing Salt

Like a sprinkling of fleur de sel—all flaky crunch and salty pizzazz—a story’s final few words can pull everything deliciously together and leave the reader both satisfied and wanting more. Omit this finishing flourish and we risk ending up with a flat, forgettable tale.

 

When we craft a story’s ending, our primary objective is narrative closure. But closure isn’t everything. We also seek to pique the reader’s appetite and leave them hankering to enjoy our story again and again, as picture books are meant to be savored. There are many ways to accomplish this, of course, but I’ll focus on one of my favorites, the deft echoing of an idea, phrase, or detail presented earlier in the story. I believe these echoes elevate a story and imbue it with lasting resonance.

 

Below are five mentor titles for your consideration. While they differ in style and genre, each possesses an admirably well-seasoned ending, thanks to an echo and its memorable finishing flavor.

 


YOU ARE LIGHT by Aaron Becker

Echo: Light 

Finishing Flavor: The Universal Becomes Personal

 










MAGIC RAMEN by Andrea Wang and Kana Urbanowicz

Echo: Food Brings Peace

Finishing Flavor: The Personal Becomes Universal

 









ADRIAN SIMCOX DOES NOT HAVE A HORSE by Marcy Campbell and Corinna Luyken—

Echo: Imaginary Horse

Finishing Flavor: Compassion Creates Connection

 






PLANTING STORIES, THE LIFE OF LIBRARIAN AND STORYTELLER PURA BELPRÉ by Anika Aldamay Denise and Paola Escobar

Echo: Arrivals

Finishing Flavor: Creating Home and Coming Home

 








SEVEN GOLDEN RINGS by Rajani LaRocca and Archana Sreenivasan

Echo: Nights Full Of Song

Finishing Flavor: Love and Family Endure

 







As you read for research, look and listen for echoes. While you write, consider which phrase or detail in your story might merit such an echo. Is there one element that tugs at your heartstrings or makes you smile? One that somehow elevates your story? This may be your finishing flavor. As you bring your story to a close, try sprinkling a bit of this flavor, this delicious echo of your words and ideas, onto the last page.

Because every story deserves an appetizing ending, and we must never, ever forget the finishing salt.



Hayley is giving away a signed, personalized copy of What Miss Mitchell Saw, plus a packet of finishing salt! to one lucky U.S. winner! To be eligible for prizes throughout the challenge, you must be registered by March 1, comment on each post, consistently read mentor texts, and enter the Rafflecopter drawing at the conclusion of ReFoReMo.


Hayley Barrett is the author of Babymoon  (Candlewick Press)  What Miss Mitchell Saw (Beach Lane Books) Girl Versus Squirrel (Margaret Ferguson at Holiday House) and The Tiny Baker (Barefoot Books). She lives outside of Boston with her husband John. Their two terrific kids have grown and flown. 


 

 

 

  

179 comments:

  1. When I brought You Are Light home from the library, my daughter fell in love with it. She didn't want me to take it back. It's such a sweet book with obvious tactile loveliness! Love your focus on the ending here. I also loved Adrian Simcox Does Not Have a Horse. I found the voice so delightful and the idea of starting the story that way really effective. I love how it dealt with a serious topic but with a humorous, flawed narrator. Can't wait to read the others today!

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  2. Super practical tip supporting a prior ReForeMo day about making sure that your writing has a musicality to it.

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  3. The finishing salt...I love this sentence. I love what you imply and I can apply. Thank you so much. A great post.

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  4. Thanks for sharing some well-seasoned favorites, Hayley.

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  5. Ah, those appetizing endings can be so tough to pull off. Thank you for these lovely examples. Planting stories is a beautiful bio. And You are Light is deceptively simple and absolutely mesmerizing.

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  6. I love it when a story feels like it has come full circle. The finishing salt is a fun way to emphasize and a reminder to take care with the end. Thank you for the suggestions today!

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  7. I love the idea of finishing salt for a story. My favorite cookie is chocolate chip with a bit of salt flakes on top! If I could get that same satisfying feel at the end of my story I would be thrilled!

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  8. The endings are what I remember about books. These are great examples of how to do it well. Thanks!

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  9. Thank you, Hayley, for the nudge to be listening for echoes as we savor picture books. "Which detail in your story might merit such an echo?"

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  10. Ready to add some "finishing salt" to my reading list this week! Thanks for the inspiration and recommendations!

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  11. Thank you, Hayley, for this wonderful post! I’ve read your choices and I love them all!

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  12. What a unique way to look at endings! Thanks for the great recommendations!

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  13. Endings are sometimes so difficult! Thank you for suggesting these mentor texts and shedding new light on how to add some finishing salt to our story endings.

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  14. I love this metaphor, and I am in particular a fan of MAGIC RAMEN and ADRIAN SIMCOX! Bravo!

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  15. Endings are so important and, yes, they elevate a story.

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  16. Sometimes the last line is harder than the first! But hen they connect it is magical. Thanks for the reminder and examples.

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  17. HAYLEY: THANK YOU for this SPRINKLING of INSPIRATION to make sure our words, meaning, and heart of our stories connect at the end--echoing our message so it continues to resonate with our readers. Making sure we have just the right flavor to tempt our readers back for more is SO IMPORTANT. You are SO RIGHT, "a story’s final few words can pull everything deliciously together and leave the reader both satisfied and wanting more." THANK YOU for this INSPIRING RECIPE and the WONDERFUL mentor books to show us the way!

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  18. I love this advice! It really does make a huge difference about how you put the book down and if you want to immediately pick it back up. Thank you!

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  19. What a fantastic post. Thank you for the reminder that the ending isn't necessarily a conclusion. I love the finishing salt metaphor and leaving the reader hungry for more.

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  20. Ooooh great post! I struggle with this. My writing teacher says that most PBs end with a surprise or a hug, but these offer some great alternatives. Thank you! Much appreciated.

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  21. Such a a great post, Hayley! Endings of books can make it or break it for me. I love how you've highlighted the "finishing flavor" in the above books. Interesting and insightful perspective! Thank you!

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  22. Oooh! I really love this idea. I'll definitely keep it in mind moving forward. Thank you, Hayley!

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  23. Thanks, Hayley! I love the idea of a “finishing flavor!!” Great mentor texts!

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  24. I love how the endings of these stories finish the "echo" from the beginning. I especially liked "Adrian Simcox Does NOT Have a Horse."

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  25. Thanks for today's titles. I love the idea of "finishing salt." Cooking metaphors are perfect for the writing process. I will chew on this idea as I work on my writing today!

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  26. Loved the way you set up this post with "echo" and "finishing flavor." What a wonderful way to consider these mentor texts!! Thank you.

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  27. The beginnings of stories hook us and endings bring complete satisfaction.

    Thank you, Hayley.

    Suzy Leopold

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  28. Thanks for sharing and spicing it up :) Best of luck to you!

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  29. Finishing flavor...brilliant. Thank you.

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  30. Thanks, Hayley. The satisfaction of the echo phrase at the end of the story does flavor the story's completion. I never thought of it quite this way before. Thanks for sharing this idea and your mentor texts which are some of my favorites.

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  31. Thanks for sharing. I've used and suggested ADRIAN SIMCOX DOES NOT HAVE A HORSE as a mentor text numerous times.

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  32. This is so true! I love books that add that "something extra" at the end that pulls everything together. I really try to do this in all my books as well because it really helps leave such a satisfying "taste" for the reader to walk away with. Thank you for this post!

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  33. Wonderful, thoughtful and mouthwatering post Haley! Thanks for sharing!

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  34. I LOVE the idea of the echo at the ending of a book and can already think of other titles that do so. Looking forward to reading these titles along with Haley's! :)

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  35. I love the idea of finishing salt! Typically we examine opening lines, but this reminds me that the ending line is also so important!

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  36. Thank you for giving us some insight on the ending of the story, emphasizing the importance of smooth, purposeful endings. "Finishing Salt" is the perfect analogy to your focus. My 5 yr old really liked SEVEN GOLD RINGS,but she loves math and music....I really liked YOU ARE LIGHT and enjoyed the full circle approach to the story. It makes me want to read it over and over again.

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  37. Echoes and flavors! Easy words to remember and strive for as we craft stories. Thanks so much for these analogies to make our endings memorable and re-readable.

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  38. Forget the amuse bouche - give me a soupçon of finishing salt indeed!
    Thanks for reminding us about the power of a call back Hayley with these wonderful examples.

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  39. Thank you for your reminder to look for echoes and remember parts of the stories that echo in my mind or remind me of this book and the importance of endings.

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  40. Love the culinary references in this post! What a great way to think about an ending - adding the finishing salt!

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  41. I can't wait to reread these books with the finishing touch in mind! Thank you!

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  42. Thank you for sharing these examples!

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  43. I love the idea of finishing salt! Thank you for sharing these wonderful mentor texts.

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  44. Endings and beginnings - the hardest parts to pull off. Thanks for the mentor texts showing how to find the echo in our stories and finishing off with a sprinkling of salt.

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  45. The finishing salt. What a beautiful way to put it. I really liked the mentor texts, especially YOU ARE LIGHT. It definitely left me wanting to read it again.

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  46. What a beautifully written post! I've just requested all your books from my library. Thank you so much, Hayley!

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  47. Thanks for great examples of lasting book endings.

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  48. I love these lines from your post, Hayley!

    As you bring your story to a close, try sprinkling a bit of this flavor, this delicious echo of your words and ideas, onto the last page. Because every story deserves an appetizing ending, and we must never, ever forget the finishing salt.

    Perfection!

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  49. I love this idea of cooking our treats and seasoning it just right until the end, then tying it up just right with the taste that will linger. I have read books that have done just that.

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  50. I love the idea of an echo that brings a story full circle at the end. And what a lovely selection books, thanks for sharing.

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  51. I love the idea of Finishing Salt. The echo as well. Adrian Simcox Does Not Have A Horse reminded me of The Hundred Dresses that I read in about 4th grade. Thank you for suggesting these newer titles.

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  52. What a lovely group of books! I'm so excited to read 2 new ones. Thanks for the post!

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  53. Finishing salt! Great metaphor for that je ne sais quoi that leaves one wanting to read a book again. It's mysterious and ephemeral, easier to identify when it's there than it is to find when you're trying to insert it in your own work.

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  54. Hayley, a very nicely considered collection of books. I adored each one. Thank you for the post. Going to look for your books at the library this very day. Thanks again!

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  55. It took me ten years to find the right ending for one manuscript. Once I had it, it seemed so obvious.

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  56. Love your creative take on satisfying stories. It suits me perfectly! Can’t wait to read these. Thanks for the inspiration.

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  57. The agree, the right ending is crucial.

    We love your GIRL VERSUS SQUIRREL PB!

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  58. Thank you, Hayley, for shedding your bright light on this important topic!

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  59. I enjoyed the focus of today's post. I just checked out Magic Ramen today from the library.

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  60. What a wonderfully delicious and thoughtful post. I will now go back and reread my work, just to make sure the seasonings are right!

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  61. The words of your post, Hayley, captured my attention.
    “Like a sprinkling of fleur de sol—all flaky crunch and salty pizzazz — a story ‘s final few words can pull everything deliciously together and leave the reader both satisfied and wanting more.” Beautifully expressed!
    Each highlighted mentor text truly has an “admirably well seasoned ending.” Thank you for giving me yummy food for thought and a challenge to embrace.

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  62. What a wonderful, flavourful post. Thanks Hayley for sharing these great mentor texts. You've made we so aware of the power of endings.

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  63. Yay, Hayley, love these choices. Endings are so crucial. TY.

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  64. Such soulful books, each leaving us with a lasting message for reflection. I enjoyed them all and have added a few to my wishlist for purchase :-)

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  65. Thank you for the reminder to pay special attention to my book's closing and to place tidbits early on in the MS that the ending can refer back to. I like learning what an echo can do for my book. Thank you!

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  66. Sometimes a strong last line turns a good book into an amazing book. I especially love to be surprised on the last page.

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  67. Thank you, Hayley. I'll be thinking about to to use echos in my own stories.

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  68. Thank you for your wonderful post about endings that echo, Hayley. Such great examples in this list!

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  69. Thank you - I loved "Magic Ramen" - had to go out a buy some as soon as I was done!

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  70. I am behind on my ReFoReMo reading, but cannot wait to get to these gems! Thanks for the great reminder for echoes/refrains/endings... salt for the food!

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  71. Thank you, Hayley, for the recommendations!

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  72. Such great recommendations! Thank you. I'm off to search for "the echo of words" and "the finishing salt."

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  73. Great list of books, Hayley! And if you can get the ending right, what a gift for the readers!

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  74. Love your post. I really enjoy books with finishing salt echoes! Thanks for the recommendations and the insightful post!

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  75. Terrific advice and mentor texts. Thank you! I love the idea of sprinkling a bit of flavor into the ending:)

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  76. "...try sprinkling a bit of this flavor, this delicious echo of your words and ideas, onto the last page." Hayley, love the feeling of adding the spice to season our stories with tantalizing words.

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  77. Finding a way to end that brings out the best of your story. Wonderful exercise and mento texts!

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  78. An "echo" and "finishing flavor" -- wonderful nuggets to keep in mind while writing. Thank you for your insight and this great list of mentor books!

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  79. Thank you for these flavorful titles!

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  80. I love the suggestions you outlined here, and the way you chose to conceptualize them. You are a beautiful writer, Hayley!

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  81. Such an interesting group of books that emphasize a satisfying ending, not a twist, but closure with style and grace.

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  82. Thank you, Hayley! I just love a story that echos a theme or feeling throughout. Thank you for introducing ADRIAN SIMCOX DOES NOT HAVE A HORSE. What a wonderful story!

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  83. I am so glad that Hayley Barrett chose to share mentor texts with great endings. As a beginning writer that has been the hardest part for me. I am never satisfied with my endings but these books offered strong examples. I also liked the way she listed the echo and finishing flavor for each story. You Are Light by Aaron Becker is an amazing book for so many reasons. It is a perfect example of how powerful a picture book can be with relatively few words. I loved the circular connection of the lyrical story from you are the light to the light is you. Excellent book.
    Magic Ramen by Andrea Wang and Kana Urbanowicz is a great biography of the man who created instant ramen noodles. The ending "peace follows from a full stomach one bowl of noodles at a time" defines how meaningful this story is. It shows how important this one man's goal to help the long lines of hungry people during war time and how that promoted peace. Adrian Simcox Does Not Have a Horse by Marcy Campbell and Corinna Luyken is written from the point of view of a girl in the same class as Adrian. She is convinced that he is lieing about having a horse and she goes so far as to call him a liar in front other students. She does notice how sad that makes him look. Then her mother takes her on a walk to his house and she realizes the horse is imaginary and her passion for him ends the story. The voice in this story sounds just like kids on any playground and the ending is very fitting and memorable. Planting Stories: The Life of Librarian and Storyteller Pura Belpre by Anika Aldamay Denise and Paola Escobar is another fascinating biography of the first Puerto Rican Librarian in New York City. When she first went to work in a library she could not believe that the Puerto Rican folktales she grew up with were not in any of the books. So she shared those stories by telling them, publishing them and putting on puppet shows and planted the seeds of those stories in others so that they were passed on from generation to generation. As a retired librarian I loved everything about this but especially liked how the story ended with her seeing others passing her stories on. Seven Golden Rings by Rajani LaRocca is a story of an Indian boy who solves a mathematical puzzle to win a place at the Rajah's court and ensure his family's prosperity. This is a capitivating story that ends with a solution that shows that love and family will endure. All of these books were great stories with powerful endings. I hope that I can use some of these techniques in my writing. Thanks for sharing!

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    1. evafelder@hotmail.com

      I read your entry every day, obviously you and me write the most. I am wondering if we ever meet, how busy our conversation would be about any subject in the world.

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  84. The flourish at the end of a great story satisfies and leaves the reader wanting more! The analog of finishing salt is perfect!
    Now back to the salt mines!

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  85. Highlighting these flavors will help me look at children's books differently. I need to revise my WIP and make sure to include an echo. Thanks

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  86. "While you write, consider which phrase or detail in your story might merit such an echo." Great advice and great list books, Hayley. I'm eager to read your book too. Thank you!

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  87. Thank you for sharing these mentor texts with appetizing endings!

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  88. Thanks for the insights, Hayley. I whole heartedly agree that the last line is every bit as important as the first. A story that falls flat at the end is very unsatisfying.

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  89. Fantastic for salt to be the final word! Maybe pepper could be another spice to make you sneeze and provide a laugh. Thank you for this great list and advice!

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  90. Thank you for the concept of satisfaction at the end so readers come back for more. I look forward to reading your mentor texts. Thank you.

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  91. Love these echoes! Thank you for sharing!

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  92. I love your analogy. We all know we need to finish well, but thanks for breaking it down and giving us an idea of HOW!!!. Great choices today

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  93. Great mentor text for how to create a good finish. I think that is the hardest part to do because you want the reader and yourself to feel satisfied. Adrian Simcox Does Not Have a Horse ended with a heartfelt conclusion tucked around a wonderful lesson for children. It reminded me of another book that I read to my students every year called, The Hundred Dresses by Eleanor Estes & Louis Slobodkin. It won the Newberry in 1945.

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  94. How to Find a Bird has an actual phrase as an echo--"That's the wonderful thing about birds"--to open and close it.

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  95. Reading this post made me so hungry! Thanks for showing us how end stories and the echos to listen for.

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  96. I so agree about endings! I generally don't indicate what I think about a book until I get to the ending which can make or break a story. Stories that have satisfied me in the way you describe include: Finding Nemo (Pixar), RUNT by Marion Dane Bauer, THE DOT by Peter H. Reynolds to name a few off the top of my head.

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  97. So many great books to check out. All so beautiful, but ADRIAN SIMCOX DOES NOT HAVE A HORSE by Marcy Campbell and Corinna Luyken really gets me with the stunning illustrations.

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  98. What a beautiful way to listen to the stories!

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  99. Thank you for this helpful and inspiring post, Hayley!

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  100. Ah, the endings. I now have to go back to my work and triple-check mine.

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  101. Endings ned narrative closure plus something that piques an appetite for more...an idea, a phrase, a detail presented earlier in the story.

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  102. This element was definitely a strength in these titles. In fact this was one of my favorite groupings of books! Thanks for sharing!

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  103. I love how you've broken down the important elements to look for. And these books are great examples of what you're talking about. Thanks!

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  104. Lovely books. I especially enjoyed Magic Ramen.

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  105. I love The Seven Golden Rings and You Are Light. Thanks for sharing the others and showing their echos.

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  106. Rhonda Kay Gatlin comment: These books fill up and gather information that kept me on my toes and I ended up flying around on my own magical carpet to ride as I read each book. These books were read while I tasted ramen noodles, looked for a horse or two and gather seven rings that came handy, but that voice it was amazing said everyone.

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  107. The first POV for ADRIAN SIMCOX DOES NOT HAVE A HORSE was well done. Such great voice.

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  108. The echos in the endings... poignant reflection, and thanks for the wonderful examples in these books. Adds another level to writing endings for me- lovely!

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  109. Thank you for your choices. Loved how in the book ADRIAN SIMCOX DOES NOT HAVE A HORSE that it shows the reader that it is more important to understand where the person is coming from than being a know it all. I purchased the book because it had such an important suttle message!

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  110. I’m now on a mission to find “fleur de sel” in every PB on my shelf. I’m going to try to limit myself to enjoying only one salted caramel, though.

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  111. Hayley, thank you for the great reminder and the interesting selection of texts. My favorite is Magic Ramen and I can't wait to read Planting Stories.

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  112. I love Magic Ramen. Thanks for the other titles I will check out, Hayley.

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  113. I love the concepts of echoes and finishing flavor. Thanks for sharing these beautiful books with us today; I have noted the titles and will refer back to them as mentor texts.

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  114. Love that idea of an echo within your story becomes the finishing salt. After all, it's what makes us want to taste that dish--and read that tale--over and over!

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  115. I love Adrian Simcox Does Not Have a Horse - I have not read You Are Light but enjoy Aaron Becker's other books. Thanks so much.

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  116. Thank you, Hayley! I love this image - "a sprinkling of fleur de sel" to finish our stories. I'm inspired!

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  117. I love your idea of sprinkling finishing salt...and thank you for these wonderful mentor texts!

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  118. I've heard repetition, and circling back, but I've never heard it described as echoes. It's a different way to think of it.

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  119. Loved this, thanks Hayley! This all rings very true; an inspiration you can almost taste ;)

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  120. What an interesting way to look at a story's finish. Echo to recall and flavor to add zest and thirsty for more! Thank you, Haylery!

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  121. Oh, I love that full circle feeling of completion!

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  122. I love the analogy to finishing salt - what a great way to remember to echo an earlier idea at the end of the story.

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  123. What an inspiring post, love it. Thanks for those beautiful mentor texts.

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  124. Thanks for sharing this fresh perspective, Hayley! I'll be looking for the echoes (and writing them too!).

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  125. Thank you Hayley, the ending of a story is probably the most important bit. If you get it right, the reader will want to read the story over and over again, but if you get it wrong, the reader is disappointed. Love your analogy.

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  126. So interesting to explore the endings. Thanks!

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  127. Ugh...endings. It's what I struggle w/most

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  128. That's such a lovely way to think about the ending of a book. I will definitely be paying more attention to the final "salt".

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  129. These echoes are the pieces that resonate with me so deeply! I'm looking carefully for these echoes in other books as well as my own WIP. I'm noticing that placement and timing is everything.

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  130. Haley, I loved this post! I’m going to look for the echo and the finishing flavor in these books and also try to put them into my own.

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  131. evafelder@hotmail.com

    Dear Hayley, thank you so much for being our mentor today. I have connected with your words immediately in a very intense way.
    I try every day to read some of the books that our mentors have written/illustrated and Babymoon and Tiny Baker have touched my heart for personal reasons. I visualize you as a wonderful cook. If you are ever in Texas please look me up and we can talk and share spices and salt in many ways.
    You Are Light is such a wonderful book that beside the story touches you in a tactile way that is very unique.
    Adrian Simocox doesn't have a horse addresses many children who are missing something in their life.
    As I read and write everyday I will be searching for the echoes.

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  132. Hayley, thank you very much for bringing these books to our attention. However, as an admirer of your craft, I need to tell you this: the sequence with the whale, the stars and the needle punching into the dark, is the single most beautiful thing I've read in a long, long time...

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  133. Hayley, this was such an interesting post and I loved the books you chose. I hereby vow that I will listen for the echo opportunities in my stories, and not forget the finishing salt. :)

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  134. Such beautiful books with just right endings. I'll be looking for the echoes.

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  135. Endings can be hard, so thanks for sharing your ideas on how to do them successfully. Your post made me think about through lines and how they can contribute to satisfying ending too. Great mentor texts suggestions!

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  136. Such a wonderful variety of mentors to show great endings. Thanks, Hayley! I love books where the ending echoes a theme or earlier line. You know it's perfect when you think, "Of course! How could this book have ended in any other way?" Then I go back to study the text that lead to this obvious finishing salt.

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  137. I love a good ending! Thank you for sharing these great examples.

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  138. A brilliant way to talk about echoes and endings, Heyley. I especially liked how you said, "...sprinkling a bit of this flavor, this delicious echo of your words and ideas, onto the last page."

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  139. Brilliant way to look at endings. Thank you!

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  140. "Like a sprinkling of fleur de sel" A beautiful way to look at endings which can be really hard to get "just right"

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  141. I was interested in MAGIC RAMEN : the Story of Momofuku Ando because the MC was an adult and one comment I get from my manuscripts is that there should be something from your MC's childhood to draw child readers in. Perhaps the real MC is instant ramen itself!

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  142. Most of my PB manuscripts circle back to the original concept or beginning of the story. I am currently on an older MC so I need to make sure the "echoes" of the story pull in the younger reader with my page turners. These book choices will help me create a strong ending...

    Great post!

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  143. Just love how you compare salt and other flavorings to crafting a picture book. I can't wait to read all of these mentor texts!

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  144. I thought all the books made me think about going back to my own manuscripts to look for opportunities to add more "finishing salt!"

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  145. I first learned about what you term "echo" reading Dave Barry's humor columns in the '90s. Now writing for children, I love finding that "echo" and using it well.

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  146. Hi Haley, Thanks for the wonderful post and recommendations. I enjoyed all of these books, as well as yours! The Tiny Bakery is so captivating. What Miss Mitchell saw will be an important mentor text if I find myself wanting to write about the life of an interesting person, historical or otherwise. You really captured the sense of place in that story.

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  147. i'm looking to make my ending GREAT! thanks for the mentor textxs to study.

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  148. Echoes and flavoring are two lovely descriptions of what makes a book a great mentor text. Thanks for such a great list.

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  149. Thanks for a terrific post! Great endings are so important.

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  150. A new way to look at endings for me. Thank you

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  151. Many of my favorite books contain echoes, and I try to use echoes in my own writing. Thanks for sharing these great examples. I especially loved Adrian Simcox Does Not Have a Horse.

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  152. I'm looking carefully for these echoes in other books as well as my own work. Thank you.

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  153. I love this analogy!!❤️❤️❤️ Thanks for drawing our attention to fine finishes in these great mentor texts!

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  154. Thank you for these mentor texts and the heads up on the endings!

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  155. I love your way of thinking about this - finishing flavor! I will be thinking about fleur de sel for every ending.

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  156. Salt! Yum! And I love the idea of endings providing an echo to an earlier phrase or idea.

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  157. Just love the feeling of endings like these. Thank you!

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  158. Love the finishing flavor metaphor used to echo an idea, phrase, or detail presented earlier in the story. Thanks, Haley!

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  159. Great reading suggestions and great advice: 'While you write, consider which phrase or detail in your story might merit such an echo.'

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  160. Thanks for this list of books which are new to me. Echoes are a favorite writing concept of mine as well!

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  161. We always need to bring the salt to our books and our lives!

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  162. This is such a great way to think about how to finish a piece. Echoes carry and resonate. Thank you.

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  163. Love the idea of echoes in our work. And the "personal becomes universal." Thanks!

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  164. Hayley - I love this way of thinking of these texts and finishing a piece. Thank you!

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  165. I love the ideas of a flavor filled ending and an echo throughout.

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  166. End with a "deft echoing of an idea, phrase, or detail presented earlier in the story." Thanks for this insight!

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  167. I love the word echo to describe the repetition of a phrase or sentence.
    A finishing of the story resonating back to the reader.

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  168. Thank you, Hayley, for articulating this so tastily, savoring the ending and wanting more ~ another reading! I appreciated the diversity of texts you chose to make your point. The motive behind the invention of ramen, of all things, was stirring, and I loved the circular way that light so seamlessly transforms into a life force in You Are Light. Adrian Simcoch was particularly salty. For me, it was more a shift in perception than compassion. Planting Stories, like Magic Ramen, another revelation of a remarkable life! Echoes in abundance. Lots to savor here!

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  169. I love studying endings. 'Planting Stories' is a great example.

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  170. I couldn't find 2 books on your list at my library. I'll have to keep searching. Thanks for sharing!

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  171. You have made these books sound so appetizing, I can't wait to eat *ahem* read them :)

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  172. Wonderful examples of meaningful and resonant endings. Love the advice to listen for echoes. Thank you!

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