Tuesday, March 30, 2021

ReFoReMo Day 22: Author Joana Pastro Kerplunks into Onomatopoeia

I believe onomatopoeia is so much more than mere representation of sound.

It helps amplify all sorts of actions and, in doing so, all sorts of emotions. In LILLYBELLE, A DAMSEL NOT IN DISTRESS, I used “Kerplunk!” repeatedly as a way to introduce a character’s intention. Here are some other examples:


CAN U SAVE THE DAY by Shannon Stocker/ Illustrated by Tom Disbury


Here, the vowels go on strike, making communication rather challenging.

“Instead of bark, the dog said ‘brk.’”

Laughter is guaranteed!

 




THE LITTLE BLUE COTTAGE by Kelly Jordan/ Illustrated by Jessica Courtney-Tickle



Who knew a “honk-honk” and a “beep-beep” could be so heartwarming?

“Then one day a faint beep-beep! echoed in the drive.”

 






TWO BICYCLES IN BEIJING by Teresa Robeson/ Illustrated by Junyi Wu



Lunzi is looking for her friend Huangche. Every “Brrr-ring-ring” fills us with hope and anticipation for their reunion.

“Brrr-ring-ring. Could it be?”

 







ROSIE THE DRAGON AND CHARLIE SAY GOOD NIGHT by Lauren H. Kerstein/ Illustrated by Nate Wragg



From the very first page, onomatopoeia sets the tone.

“ZIPEEEEE! WAHOO! Rosie the superdragon saves the world!”

 This story is full of frolicking fun and mishaps!

 




WOOD, WIRE, WINGS by Kirsten W. Larson/ Illustrated by Tracy Subisak


Here, onomatopoeia helps show Lillian’s inquisitive spirit, hard work, frustrations, excitement and accomplishment when she finally succeeds.

“It lifted off, soaring toward the future . . . BBRRRMM BRRMMMM”.

So go ahead: Add those sounds! Let those feelings soar!


Joana is giving away a copy of LILLYBELLE, A DAMSEL NOT IN DISTRESS to one lucky U.S. winner! To be eligible for prizes throughout the challenge, you must be registered by March 1, comment on each post, consistently read mentor texts, and enter the Rafflecopter drawing at the conclusion of ReFoReMo.





Joana Pastro always wanted to be an artist of some sort. So, she became an architect. But once her first child was born, all the visits to the library, and the countless story times made Joana start dreaming of becoming a children’s book author. After a lot of reading, writing and revising, her dream came true. Her debut picture book, LILLYBELLE, A DAMSEL NOT IN DISTRESS, illustrated by Jhon Ortiz, was published by Boyds Mills Press in 2020. Her second book, BISA’S CARNAVAL, illustrated by Carolina Coroa will be published by Scholastic in November, 2021. Originally from Brazil, Joana now lives in Florida with her husband, her three extremely creative children, a rambunctious Morkie, and a needy Maltipoo. Visit her on Twitter @jopastro, Instagram @jppastro , or at www.joanapastro.com.

171 comments:

  1. Thanks for this list of mentor texts. Can U Save the Day is so clever!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thanks for your post. Can U Save the Day was a joy to read. Onomatopoeia creates atmosphere to the worlds created by words. Without it, it just feels wrong.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Fun post Joana, it's always fun to see how authors use onomatopoeia in their books. These are such awesome examples. I love TWO BICYCLES IN BEIJING! Thank you so much.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Sounds add such fun! Thank you for these great examples. I also have a rambunctious Morkie. She gives me some good story ideas!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Sounds add such fun! Thank you for these great examples. I also have a rambunctious Morkie. She gives me some good story ideas!

    ReplyDelete
  6. Great post - onomatopoeia is such a direct and economic way of adding feeling and excitement to a text!

    ReplyDelete
  7. So many books with ZING that I haven't hear of! Looking forward to reading some of these. Thanks for sharing!

    ReplyDelete
  8. Wow! Love the excitement onomatopoeia brings to books. As we do read alouds with children, they love to echo and join in! Thank you for these mentor texts!

    ReplyDelete
  9. These are wonderful mentor texts, Joana. Each is clever but the onomatopoeia adds a sprinkle of fun.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Thanks for this post today! I love a good onomatopoeia! It often acts as a good attention getter!!!

    ReplyDelete
  11. Great post! Onamodapea words add plenty of fun to a story.

    ReplyDelete
  12. These are great choices, Joana. I adore the liveliness that onomatopoeia adds to reading picture books out loud.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Thank you for this post, Joana! Love onomatopoeia and the examples given. I just read and fell in love with THE LITTLE BLUE COTTAGE!

    ReplyDelete
  14. I love books that contain onomatopoeia! Thanks so much for the great list!

    ReplyDelete
  15. I love books that contain onomatopoeia! Thanks so much for the great list!

    ReplyDelete
  16. Thank you for this post Joana! All of these mentor texts were new to me. I especially enjoyed THE LITTLE BLUE COTTAGE and TWO BICYCLES IN BEIJING.

    ReplyDelete
  17. These books look like they could brighten any kid's day. As a grownup, I can't wait to read them myself! Thank you.

    ReplyDelete
  18. This was a fun reading list. I had not read any of these books before, The Little Blue Cottage was my favorite. I really enjoy the use of onomatopoeia...maybe one day one of my books will use the same word technique.

    ReplyDelete
  19. What a great list. I keep a sounds notebook and this post is definitely going into it for future reference. Thank you, Joana!

    ReplyDelete
  20. Onomatopoeia definitely adds some readaloudability to these texts. Super fun and very effective, especially when used purposefully.

    ReplyDelete
  21. Thank you Joana for this fantastical post! Onomatopoeia definitely brings stories to a whole new level.

    ReplyDelete
  22. Adding sounds brings fun to the reader and the listener. Thank you for the book list.

    ReplyDelete
  23. Thanks for pointing out these examples, the use of onomatopoeia was so subtle and seamless, I almost missed it!

    ReplyDelete
  24. These are a librarian's dream read alouds! Thanks.

    ReplyDelete
  25. While I'll always have difficulty spelling onomatopoeia, I will now look and listen to it in different ways. I hadn't thought about the sounds evoking feeling.

    ReplyDelete
  26. Love onomatopoeia (except when I try to spell it!). Thanks for highlighting some new-to-me mentor texts that use it great effect.

    ReplyDelete
  27. Enjoyed this list of books and the way they employ onomatopoeia.

    ReplyDelete
  28. Onomatopoeias are so much fun! Thanks for this great list.

    ReplyDelete
  29. Thank you Joana for reminding me of the use of onomatopoeia in differing ways.

    ReplyDelete
  30. Hi Joana! I know these picture books well. But I still need to read yours, LILLYBELLE, A DAMSEL NOT IN DISTRESS. Thanks for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
  31. Thanks for the reminder of all the ways onomatopoeia can be used! Lynn

    ReplyDelete
  32. I still haven't been able to see CAN U SAVE THE DAY! Argh! Oh, that was ironic that I made that sound! Thanks Joana for the list! Loved the bikes in Beijing book-oh the longing!

    ReplyDelete
  33. The only thing I don't like about onomatopoeia is trying to spell it!

    ReplyDelete
  34. Onomatopoeia is so fun, for kids, adults reading to them, and even the writers writing the story!

    ReplyDelete
  35. As a new writer, I'm starting to notice onomatopoeia's important role in kid lit. Thank you for such a great list of mentor texts.

    ReplyDelete
  36. Thanks so much for the great titles. Loved reading about Lillybelle! And The Little Blue Cottage is so sweet.

    ReplyDelete
  37. Woot, I love me some good onomatopoeia! Thanks, Joana.

    ReplyDelete
  38. Great post! I am trying to include this more in my writing. Thanks for the inspiration.

    ReplyDelete
  39. I love the word play in Can U Save the Day! Children already know that sounds and words are fun -- thank you for sharing these books that join in that fun!

    ReplyDelete
  40. Such wonderful books from my wonderful critique partners. So happy to have these in my library and see them shared with the world. Best, Lynne Marie

    ReplyDelete
  41. I love books with onomatopoeia!

    ReplyDelete
  42. Thanks for recommending these examples!

    ReplyDelete
  43. Great post and such fun to say all those lovely "sound" words out loud! Each one made me smile and say it over again. Onomatopoeia can play such an integral part in stories. Thank you for your recommendations!

    ReplyDelete
  44. Love to read it! Love to write it! I have not read The Little Blue Cottage but I will now. Thank you!

    ReplyDelete
  45. Joana, congratulations on your success as a picture book writer. Your journey is inspiring!
    I love to write stories with onomatopoeia. They are such fun read-alouds. Thank you for sharing short summaries of how each author used onomatopoeia in their picture books to engage the reader. Very helpful!

    ReplyDelete
  46. Living the dream as a creative is my dream. I love using sound devices!

    ReplyDelete
  47. Couldn’t get any of these books in time from my library system for this last day, but I’ll read when they get here! Onomatopoeia brings a fun and emotional addition to stories. Zip! Zoom! And away we go!

    ReplyDelete
  48. Thanks for this great post, Joana! These books really bring forth the value (and fun) of onomatopoeia. I’m looking forward to reading your next book!

    ReplyDelete
  49. Great examples of how the use of onomatopoeia helps to engage the reader of these stories. I loved "Rosie the Dragon and Charlie Make Waves."

    ReplyDelete
  50. Thank you for your comments and the list of books. CAN U SAVE THE DAY? was so funny!

    ReplyDelete
  51. Thanks for the great mentor texts focusing on onomatopoeia. I appreciated your calling our attention to the connection between onomatopoeia and emotions. I really hadn't focused on that before, but I will be much more aware of it now, thanks to your post.

    ReplyDelete
  52. BAM! Nailed it!
    Thanks for sharing the great examples.

    ReplyDelete
  53. Thank you Joana - these are wonderful mentor texts for many reasons, including using onomatopoeia!

    ReplyDelete
  54. Brr-ing, brang, BRUNG! Nicely done. Thanks.

    ReplyDelete
  55. Joana - thanks for a great post and wonderful mentor texts! I love how all these sounds spark emotions!

    ReplyDelete
  56. I love the use of onomatopoeia! Thanks, Joana!

    ReplyDelete
  57. I was able to read all these titles and enjoy your thoughts and post. Thank you. Great examples and job!

    ReplyDelete
  58. Thanks for the reminder to use onomatopoeia. Such a funny word for short sound.

    ReplyDelete
  59. Thanks for the reminder to use onomatopoeia. Such a funny word for short sound.

    ReplyDelete
  60. Thanks for the reminder to use onomatopoeia. Such a funny word for short sound.

    ReplyDelete
  61. A great list of books today. Thank you!

    ReplyDelete
  62. Thanks so much for sharing these fun mentor texts.

    ReplyDelete
  63. JOANA: WHAT A GREAT POST! THANK YOU for highlighting other ways onomatopoeia can enhance our writing. The examples you gave show how just a few simple sounds can TRULY "amplify all sorts of actions and, in doing so, all sorts of emotions." My eyes were OPENED to new and EXCITING writing possibilities today! THANK YOU for the INSPIRATION! Also, SO EXCITED to read "LILLYBELLE, A DAMSEL NOT IN DISTRESS"! TOO ADORABLE--AND GIRL POWER MOTIVATING!!!

    ReplyDelete
  64. Just wanted to say thanks for your post. I love that you pinpointed different examples of how onomatopoeia works. So helpful!

    ReplyDelete
  65. Thanks Joana for this list. I definitely agree that onomotapoeia amplifies emotion and action and is fun to read and listen to. I am definitely trying to incorporate more sound into my manuscripts and these mentor texts will certainly help with that. Can U Save the Day by Shannon Stocker, illustrated by Tom Disbury is a very clever book that shows that teamwork is essential by removing vowels from words. When B and the rest of the alphabet tease the vowels for their small numbers they take off and soon the consonants realize how important all of the letters are.
    The sounds and word play make this an excellent read aloud and a creative mentor text. The Little Blue Cottage by Kelly Jordan, illustrated by Jessica Courtney is a lyrical story of a little girl who visits the special cottage every summer with her family. The cottage actually becomes a character and misses the little girl when she no longer comes.Then a whole new generation comes to the cottage, restores it aand the memories continue. This book is an excellent example of beautiful rhythmic language. Two Bicycles in Beijing by Teresa Robeson, illustrated by Junyi Wu is another extremely creative story written from the point of view of two bicycles, friends from the factory and bike shop, that are sold to different people. They travel the city of Beijing exploring sights and sounds of the city in this beautiful story of friendship. Again the poetic language of the story coupled with the gorgeous illustrations make it a unque memorable book. Rosie the Dragon and Charlie Say Good Night by Lauren Kerstein, illustrated by Nate Wragg is a story filled with descriptive language and imagery as it describes the routine a little boy follows to put his dragon to bed. This a delightful bedtime story in every sense of the word. Wood,Wire and Wings by Kirsten W. Larson, illustrated by Tracy Subisak is a true story of the first female inventor of a plane, Emma Lillian Todd. Using actual quotes and sayings from Lillian herself this book tells of her perseverance until success. It is a very inspiring, beautifully written story of a little know historical figure. All of these books are creative and memorable in the telling of their stories.They offer great lessons to model. I am so glad to have been exposed to these books.

    ReplyDelete
  66. A great reminder to listen to the words you write. Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  67. I feel like onomatopoeia is another one of those things that is so good when done well, and so easy to do poorly. Am I overthinking again? Thanks for models so I can learn to do it well.

    ReplyDelete
  68. I love onomatopoeia books as they help with learning sounds to substitute for words if English is not a first language.

    A child can say brrrrrrr and learn it's for the cold to be able to communicate that they are cold, to an adult, when there are too many new words to learn.

    ReplyDelete
  69. I occasionally use onomatopoeia in my manuscripts. These are excellent examples of how to use it to enhance the story. Thanks for sharing.

    Great post!

    Donna L Martin

    ReplyDelete
  70. Thank you for this learning opportunity. I probably would not have paid attention to the onomatopoeia if you hadn't pointed it out. I was engaged in each story and the illustrations and, to be honest, just reading for pleasure .. .then I remembered there is a mission to each day, haha, and went back to "study". These were stories each with a different feel, but threaded by the commonality of word sound. so cool

    ReplyDelete
  71. I love working with onomatopoeia! Thank you for this!

    ReplyDelete
  72. I absolutely LOVED "Can U Save the Day?" Thank you!

    ReplyDelete
  73. I love onomatopoeia! Thanks for sharing this list.

    ReplyDelete
  74. Thanks so much, Joana! I'm a big fan of onomatopoeia and this list is great!

    ReplyDelete
  75. There is nothing more fun than making a little noise. Thanks, Joana!

    ReplyDelete
  76. Onomatopoeia are such fun! Thanks for this great list of books using them, Joana. Looking forward to reading them.

    ReplyDelete
  77. I'm a huge fan of onomatopoeia, especially since I finally learned how to spell it correctly, LOL. Kids love language play, and I think those who read books with kids do too! There's only one on your list I haven't read, so will be adding it to my TBR list. Thank you!

    ReplyDelete
  78. I love how onomatopoeia engages the reader, and frequently pulls in a listener, too, to actively engage in some lively reading. Who doesn't want to participate and make silly or crazy or scary sounds?

    ReplyDelete
  79. A good reminder to have some fun with your words as you write. Really brings the story alive and helps create great read aloud books.

    ReplyDelete
  80. A good reminder to have some fun with your words as you write. Really brings the story alive and helps create great read aloud books.

    ReplyDelete
  81. A good reminder to have some fun with your words as you write. Really brings the story alive and helps create great read aloud books.

    ReplyDelete
  82. The playfulness of onomatopoeia is part of the magic of so many picture books. I love the range of titles you highlight.

    ReplyDelete
  83. Thank you for the mentor texts to check out. Sounds definitely bring back memories/emotions.

    ReplyDelete
  84. A reader often puts in 'sounds' when reading. Adding them to the text can enhance their significance. fun list. thanks.

    ReplyDelete
  85. Oh these look like fabulous mentor texts, thank you! I had not thought so much about the power of onomatopoeia before and I’m going to pay attention to what it does to the story and to me as the listener!

    ReplyDelete
  86. Hi Joana, Thanks so much for sharing these! I love how you connected onomatopoeia with giving more OOMPH to action and emotion. I have been wanting to use more of it in my writing, and this explanation is just the thing I need to add it purposefully, not just for the sake of doing it.

    ReplyDelete
  87. onomatopoeia is one of my favorite devices. love this list of examples. Congrats on your debut book.

    ReplyDelete
  88. Wonderful titles! I really really loved THE LITTLE BLUE COTTAGE. I've never read anything like it really. It's not in rhyme, but uses so much lyrical language, assonance and near rhymes, and is written in a very clear meter, that it almost feels like it should rhyme, but yet it works perfectly well that it doesn't. Loved it! Thanks for sharing!

    ReplyDelete
  89. Thank you. Yet again I was unable to get all the recommended mentor texts but what I got, I enjoyed.

    ReplyDelete
  90. Thank you, Joana, for these titles that sing with onomatopoeia. Great mentor texts :) Congratulations on your debut picture book!

    ReplyDelete
  91. A great reminder that we don't have to stick to 'real words'!

    ReplyDelete
  92. Thank you for your post. I appreciate content that focuses on craft and its development. Good luck in producing more books!

    ReplyDelete
  93. Rosie and Charlie have been on my list for a while and Wood, Wire, Wings is lovely! I have long admired Two Bicycles in Beijing and its amazing author. Thank-you

    ReplyDelete
  94. Onomatopoeia is one of my favorite tools. Thanks for introducing me to some new examples of it.

    ReplyDelete
  95. Finally got to read Can U Save the Day. Loved it. I am a word, letter AND grammar nerd. Haven't been able to find LILLYBELLE, A DAMSEL NOT IN DISTRESS in any of my nearby libraries, so I hope I win it. Thank you, Joana, for this list of excellent books that demonstrate onomatopoeia.

    ReplyDelete
  96. These mentor texts are so much fun! I love onomatopoeia!

    ReplyDelete
  97. Fun reads! I especially enjoyed Two Bicycles in Beijing!

    ReplyDelete
  98. This is one of the most important things I want to absorb from ReFoReMo, because for some reason, I don't automatically include onomatopoeia in my manuscripts...it's always more of an afterthought. But I think it's really a fun and necessary component to children's storytelling. Thank you for sharing!

    ReplyDelete
  99. Love these! Onomatopoeia can add a layer of immersion in a story!

    ReplyDelete
  100. Brrrr...ring..ring! takes me right back to my childhood. Thanks for these titles and the fun topic.

    ReplyDelete
  101. These is a lovely collection of picture books, each using onomatopoeia in slightly different ways to amplify voice and emotion. Thank you for presenting these mentor text. Looking forward to LILLYBELLE!

    ReplyDelete
  102. Thanks for this amazing food for thought. I hadn’t realized the many possibilities for using onomatopoeia.

    ReplyDelete
  103. Onomatopoeia is such fun. Thanks for sharing a great group of books.

    ReplyDelete
  104. Onomatopoeia is so much fun! (The trickiest part is spelling onomatopoeia, but the sounds themselves are so much fun to read and spell.) Thank you for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
  105. BRRIINNG on the onomatopoeia! Of course it's the perfect literary device for picture books, begging to be read aloud. Thank you for the great list Joana. (I also REALLY enjoyed your LILLYBELLE, A DAMSEL NOT IN DISTRESS from Day 11.)

    ReplyDelete
  106. I Love these examples of books using onomatopoeia. Sounds make for great read-alouds.

    ReplyDelete
  107. Thank you for suggesting these titles. I look forward to reading them when they come in at the library.

    ReplyDelete
  108. Onomatopoeia is my favorite! Thanks for these shining examples of how it adds to picture books.

    ReplyDelete
  109. I loved these new titles and I was happy to read so many new books. Fun to be introduced to them. Thank you.

    ReplyDelete
  110. Great list, Joana! Nice to see titles from familiar, fabulous authors! :) Thank you.

    ReplyDelete
  111. evafelder@hotmail.com

    Thank you Joana for your choice of books using Onomatopoeia. It seems very easy to create but it is quite difficult for me. It gives such a fun rhythm to the story and is very appealing to children. I can not wait to read your next book "Bisa's Carnaval". Coming from a country where Carnaval is celebrated in such a grandiose manner as you do, I am sure that the book is going to be fun and very colorful.
    Can U Save The Day is such a smart book about friendship and cooperation. It is also about bulling which hurts so many children. I can see the kids giggling as they stutter with the words without the vowels. Shannon Stocker is a very strong woman who has fought and still does adversity at a very young age. Being a singer and song writer she creates biographies of musicians with challenges and stories about characters with health issues. I was very touched by the reason she started writing.
    The Little Blue Cottage such a warm book of friendship and love between a girl and the family blue cottage. The excitement of the cottage can be felt as the onomatopoeia of the sound of the car is heard every summer. It is a memory book of the author's childhood as her parents built a cottage in Florida when she was a baby and they spent their vacations there.
    Charlie sure has a full time job taking care of Rosie. The sounds and colors in this book set the mood of every moment in the story.
    Teresa Robeson was inspired to write her book when she traveled to China with her family, seeing the large number of people using only bicycles for transportation. Such a wonderful story about friends being separated, looking for each other at all times and being reunited when their owners cross paths in a bakery. All life possibilities.
    I am so grateful to have been introduced to Emma Lilian Todd, the first woman to become a member of The Aeronautic Society. "To her problems were like gusts of wind: they set her mind soaring" I just can say WOW!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. evafelder@hotmail.com

      bullying not bulling, I must edit my comment

      Delete
  112. I read all of these books except for Two Bicycles in Beijing, which I am still trying to get from my library, and I agree that the use of onomatopoeia adds to both the actions and the emotions. I must remember to use it more often. Thanks for the reminder! (By the way, I just read LillyBelle with my grandson and we both laughed at how she didn't follow Lady Frilly's teachings and did not need to wait to be rescued. Great book!)

    ReplyDelete
  113. I enjoyed how onomatopoeia made these books come alive. It was great to see it used in the true story, Wood, Wire, Wings.

    ReplyDelete
  114. Now I'm on the hunt for more books like the ones on this list. The Little Blue Cottage was my favorite. Waiting with the cottage to hear a honk, honk, beep, beep was great for pacing. I will buy this one for a friend of mines that owns a cottage in MI. Her grandchildren come up and they read around a bonfire at night. I'm working on a spring story and the Onomatopoeia might be good to add some bounce. Thanks

    ReplyDelete
  115. Thank you for sharing these picture books that use onomatopoeia.

    ReplyDelete
  116. Joana, my students love books with onomatopoeia! It really helps them to enjoy and connect with the story! On a side note, I also have a needy Maltipoo!

    ReplyDelete
  117. Such beautiful books! Thank you for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
  118. LillyBelle was lots of fun! Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  119. I simply love books that have "sound" in them--I tend to over act them with my students so it adds a little pizzaz to our day. Thank you for sharing some great stories.

    ReplyDelete
  120. Thank you, Joana. I’ve just started adding onomatopoeia to my writing and truly appreciate how it contributes to the overall mood of the story.

    ReplyDelete
  121. Thanks, Joana for reminding us how much texture and fun onomatopoeia can add to a story!

    ReplyDelete
  122. Word play is fun. Sometimes, I wonder if my sounds read correctly. LOl

    ReplyDelete
  123. A wonderful selection of books today. I'm happy my library took my suggestion to order Kirsten Larson's book. Nice to see it on their shelves and in my hands.

    ReplyDelete
  124. Thank you Joana! These are wonderful books.

    ReplyDelete
  125. Those added sounds really engage all the senses and listeners love to repeat those words, adding to the enjoyment! Thanks so much.

    ReplyDelete
  126. I love the sound of these books! Thanks for a great list!

    ReplyDelete
  127. Joana, I love reading (and writing) stories with a magical touch of onomatopoeia, but I hadn't really considered how it can amplify emotions. Just another reason to add that zzzing to your writing, even if it drives spellcheck crazy. I especially enjoyed Rosie the Dragon, and loved your twist on fairy tales with the spunky Lillybelle.

    ReplyDelete
  128. I'm working on a story filled with onomatopoeia right now so this was really helpful!

    ReplyDelete
  129. Thanks for the great examples! Sounds give so much fun and feeling to these books.

    ReplyDelete
  130. comment Rhonda Kay Gatlin Please tell me what to do, I want to get in the Rafflecopter. I have my story ready along with synopsis and hook. Please help me I have work so hard to read so many books. I am up to 79 picture book read and more to coming, My library will be glad that I want be asking for so many books next month. The pick of today is Can You Save the Day- good read aloud it is comparable the book where the crayons went on strike. Please help me find out what to do for tomorrow with my story.

    ReplyDelete
  131. I love onomatopoeia but didn't really think of the different genres where I could use it. I kind of thought of it for the really youngest reader. So thank you for your suggestions. I must read on!

    ReplyDelete
  132. Can't wait to read Can You Save The Day by Shannon Stocker to my kinders. And I love creating my own sound words and using onomatopoeia in my stories.

    ReplyDelete
  133. Two bicycles in Beijing - the sounds just take you there and make you part of the story!

    ReplyDelete
  134. Thank you Joanna for these wonderful suggestions!! Onomatopoeia is so fun to read aloud.

    ReplyDelete
  135. Just heard other discussion of Two Bicycles in Beijing today. What fun when thoughts and ideas come together from different places in our lives. Thanks for these great suggestions. Onomatopoeia is so much fun!

    ReplyDelete
  136. Thank you for all of these great examples. Incorporating onomatopoeia is a great way to enrich the picture book experience for readers/listeners.

    ReplyDelete
  137. I love using onomatopoeia! But I often wonder how the best spelling should go and how to use it...all caps? On its own? In conversation? Thanks for your helpful post!

    ReplyDelete
  138. Another en pointe post about onomatopoeia (and I still can't spell the word, LOL!) I loved all these examples and they're fantastic mentor texts.

    ReplyDelete
  139. Yay for onomatopoeia! Another great list--thank you so much for sharing, Joana!

    ReplyDelete
  140. Onomatopoeia makes reading aloud extra fun! Thank you for these engaging examples!

    ReplyDelete
  141. Listeners love to repeat those words, adding to the enjoyment! Thanks so much.

    ReplyDelete
  142. Thank you for your post. I love onomatopoeia in writing and in reading a book aloud!

    ReplyDelete
  143. Thank you Joanna! I especially loved reading Can U Save the Day out loud - so much fun!

    ReplyDelete
  144. Lovely books and I have The Little Blue Cottage in my personal collection.

    ReplyDelete
  145. The language in ROSIE THE DRAGON AND CHARLIE SAY GOODNIGHT was vivid. I liked that there were no adult figures in sight.

    ReplyDelete
  146. I’m so bummed my library only had 1 of your recommended books. I’ll have to keep searching for the rest. Thanks for sharing!

    ReplyDelete
  147. The use of onomatopoeia has improved so many of my ms. Great list of titles here. I've read a couple and can't wait to check the others out. Thank you!

    ReplyDelete
  148. I loved the sparing use of onomatopoeia in Two Bicycles and the Little Blue Cottage!

    ReplyDelete
  149. Thanks for these recommendations for examples on how onomatopoeia adds a fun, engaging element to picture books! I will be thinking how I can use it in my own projects.

    ReplyDelete
  150. Lovely stories- thanks so much. Onomatopoeia is wonderful to use, and these are great examples! The two bicycles story is something I never would have imagined on my own- fabulous!

    ReplyDelete
  151. I LOVE onomatopoeia! Thanks so much for these wonderful examples, Joana!

    ReplyDelete
  152. Onomatopoeia brings so much life to a story. :) Great examples!

    ReplyDelete
  153. Great examples, Joana! I have not read Little Blue Cottage yet, but I love how Little Blue Truck says "Beep!" And, I love your Lillybelle book. Thank you!

    ReplyDelete
  154. Onomatopoeia can be a clever way of evoking emotions in a story. Thanks for the great list of mentor texts, Joanna!

    ReplyDelete
  155. Wonderful examples, Joana. Thank you! Great list to study.

    ReplyDelete
  156. Love how your list shows that onomatopoeia can be used in any kind of book from funny to even quieter books and narrative nonfiction.

    ReplyDelete
  157. Can't wait to check out these books. I love the idea of Onomatopoeia as integral rather than 'just' enhancement.

    ReplyDelete
  158. Love how these texts showed the different ways we can use onomatopoeia.

    ReplyDelete
  159. Sometimes onamatapeis are challenging and off-putting
    when reading books aloud. “Can U Save the Day” made me
    a convert! Lots of different approaches to celebrate in this collection
    of mentor texts ~ and I’m grateful to find about about Lillian Todd.
    Thank you!

    ReplyDelete
  160. Great topic and list! Can't wait to read these beauties. :)

    ReplyDelete
  161. I love onomatopoeia, and agree that it amplifies emotion and action. Looking forward to reading the new-to-me mentor titles in your list

    ReplyDelete
  162. Wow! Kerploosh! I've loved immersing myself in these picture books this month. I'll check out the fun books listed.

    ReplyDelete