Tuesday, March 9, 2021

ReFoReMo Day 7: Author Traci Sorell Focuses on Using Questions in Narrative Nonfiction

I love reading picture book biographies, especially those featuring people that I have never heard about previously. But, as a writer, I also love analyzing the structures employed to share their stories. These titles all ask questions to move the story along and engage readers, including The Tree Lady—the mentor text that inspired me as I crafted Classified, my first picture book biography.

 

No Small Potatoes: Junius G. Groves and His Kingdom in Kansas, written by Tonya Bolden and illustrated by Don Tate


 





Beatrix Potter, Scientist
, written by Lindsay H. Metcalf and illustrated by Junyi Wu

 






Dinosaur Lady: The Daring Discoveries of Mary Anning, theFirst Paleontologist, written by Linda Skeers and illustrated by Marta Álvarez Miguéns


 





The Tree Lady: The True Story of How One Tree-Loving WomanChanged A City Forever, written by H. Joseph Hopkins and illustrated by Jill McElmurry


 




Classified: The Secret Career of Mary Golda Ross,Cherokee Aerospace Engineer
, written by Traci Sorell and illustrated by Natasha Donovan








Traci is giving away a copy of Classified: The Secret Career of Mary Golda Ross,Cherokee Aerospace Engineer  to one lucky U.S. winner! To be eligible for prizes throughout the challenge, you must be registered by March 1, comment on each post, consistently read mentor texts, and enter the Rafflecopter drawing at the conclusion of ReFoReMo.

Traci Sorell writes fiction and nonfiction for young people. Her most recent works include We Are Still Here! Native American Truths Everyone Should Know and Classified: The Secret Career of Mary Golda Ross, Cherokee Aerospace Engineer. She is an enrolled citizen of the Cherokee Nation and lives with her family on the tribe’s reservation in northeastern Oklahoma. https://www.tracisorell.com/

 

194 comments:

  1. I was able to read three of these books. I was impressed by the refrain that changed slightly in Tree Lady and the voice in No Small Potatoes. I thought Beatrix Potter, Scientist was interesting because it was a different angle on how she came to write an illustrate for children than I had heard before. I look forward to reading your book,
    Traci. Thanks for this list of mentor texts.

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  2. Traci, I love all of these books. Especially Dinosaur Lady. I love the way Linda Skeers included some facet of Mary's curiosity, fascination, and search for knowledge on almost every page, drawing this thread through the book. Although looking at a different angle, Beatrix Potter, Scientist wove a thread of observation, discovery, and art throughout her whole life. Congrats on Classified! Thanks for the list.

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  3. Thanks for your interesting post. I’m anxious to read your book, Classified.

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  4. Thank you for sharing these inspiring biographies.

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  5. I can't wait to investigate these outstanding titles. Thank you for an invigorating post today! I am excited to read classified.

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  6. These narratives that engage readers are glorious. Thank you, Traci.

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  7. I am only familiar with Tree Lady so I’m excited to check out the rest of these titles and consider their structures. Thank you!

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  8. Great list of mentor texts, Traci. Thank you. I'm already a fan of The Tree Lady and look forward to reading some new ones you mentioned, including Classified.

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  9. I’ve only read “”The Tree Lady” so far & I’m looking forward to reading the other narrative nonfiction examples.

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  10. What a great prize! Thank you!

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  11. Thanks for this great list. Your book looks very interesting!

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  12. I also love Tree Lady, and it has inspired me many times in my writing. I've not read the others, so for me they are great suggestions!

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  13. The structure of THE TREE LADY is very interesting. On some spreads, one side has illustration and the other has text. Other pages have illustration on both sides along with the text. The page turn, "But Kate did," made me want to turn the pages.

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    1. These kinds of page turns are what makes PBs so fun to read. I'm looking to "find" that page turn paternities in my own story. I always admire other authors for their creativity when they pull it off.

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  14. I love learning about people in new ways. I look forward to reading these books.

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  15. What a list! Most of these bios are new to me but The Tree Lady has been a favorite for awhile. It's a great example of how to use a simple, effective (and sometimes varied) refrain.

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  16. It is amazing how far biographies have come! These are great introductions to people to celebrate and emulate!

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  17. Thanks for sharing these titles.

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  18. Thanks for sharing these biographies. I'm keen to know now what questions they ask and what structures they employ.

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  19. Hi Traci,
    I feel in love with THE THREE LADY when I first began reading PB bios. I love the device of asking questions to draw readers in! And, I need to pick up CLASSIFIED ASAP. Ty so much.

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  20. These look fantastic. I'm looking forward to checking them out. Thank you!

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  21. The cover art for The Tree Lady drew me in, the words kept me. The title of your PB, Classified, draws me in. My older son is an Aerospace Engineer.

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  22. These PB are all in my queue at the library & I can't wait to pick them up today & dig into their questions.

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  23. I love the idea of repetition in these bios. Thanks for sharing.

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  24. I never knew that about Beatrix Potter and Tree Lady is such a great book. Great choices!

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  25. Thanks for sharing. They're all new to me!

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  26. Thanks, Traci, for sharing these narrative nonfiction titles.

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  27. Thank you for this great collection of mentor texts. Questions are compelling. I look forward to reading CLASSIFIED! Thanks so much for being a writer for readers and for writers honing their craft.

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  28. These are great mentor texts. Thank you for sharing, Traci!

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  29. Great selection of texts to review. Thanks for the post!

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  30. thank you for all the information. It will lead to many questions I am sure. :)

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  31. Thank you, Traci, for introducing me to these beautifully written and illustrated picture books. I was intrigued by Tonya Bolden’s use of alliteration. Each of these biographies help the reader to see the value of curiosity, diligence (working to reach one’s dream) and courage in the face of challenge or ridicule. Powerful books!

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  32. Just need to read one more of these. Thanks.

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  33. Thank you Traci for this great list. They all sound so interesting! I can't wait to read yours (and the book that inspired you - Tree Lady!).

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  34. There are amazing people everywhere! Thanks for sharing these books.

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  35. I loved the approach of asking questions within the biographies. I never knew that Beatrix Potter was a scientist before she wrote her stories.

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  36. TRACI: THANK YOU for these WONDERFUL examples that illustrate the importance of asking questions to inspire our own writing. This allows us to then use them to help children understand the importance of asking questions and seeing all the AMAZING ways the answers can lead them to a world of discovery. THANK YOU for the INSPIRATION!

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  37. An interesting group of biographies differing in point of view and voice but each told in a way to spark kids' curiosity and inspire them to make a difference.

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  38. Thank you, Traci! If only we led with our questions instead of our certainties, I think we'd have a much kinder world.

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  39. The Tree Lady is one of my favorite PB Bios. Thank you for the other suggestions. I haven’t gotten them yet, but I will! Congrats on your new book!

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  40. Oh, my goodness, these biographies seemed like such epic reads to me! I especially enjoyed two of them: the Beatrix Potter biography, because I had NO idea she was a scientist and the NO SMALL POTATOS regarding Junius Groves! It was an awe inspiring biography - to think of the very proud history of the town he built! Wonderful, Wonderful reads!

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  41. I love reading biographies about people that I haven't heard about. Congratulations on your success, Traci!

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  42. I found "THE TREE LADY" very interesting. I studied the illustrations and noticed that one side had illustration and the other had text. Other pages have illustration on both sides along with the text. This book had good page turning enticers "But Kate did," made me want to turn the pages. I found other books written by the same and found similar patterns. By the end of the books I wanted to read the back story offered at the end...and find out more about the characters. These books are good reads for older children, as well as Middle school-aged kids. I take books like this with me to our middle school, and kids read to my dog. The biography illustrated books are always a big hit.

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  43. Thank you for sharing these wonderful biographies. CLASSIFIED is the only one I haven't read yet, and I can't wait to get my hands on it.

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  44. Congratulations on publishing Classified! It sounds fantastic!

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  45. I'm still trying to get my hands on CLASSIFIED and THE TREE LADY and looking forward to reading them!

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  46. Thanks for the great selection.

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  47. Thank you for your research into these stories I can't wait to read the Classified story. I am reading more non-fiction thanks to these suggestions.

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  49. I enjoyed these books! I can't wait to read Classified. It's great to hear how these books inspired yours. Congratulations on yours!

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  50. Thanks for sharing these amazing titles. I enjoyed The Tree Lady, and how it was told like a story and used the repeating words, "Not everyone...but Kate did!" I also liked the inclusion of factual information on pages about tree types!

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  51. Thanks for connecting us to these outstanding mentor texts!

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  52. I enjoyed, took notes and learned something from each of these books you chose- except Classified. (I haven't been able to find a copy yet) I am inspired by the dedication and hard work demonstrated in various ways in these books and the creative devises the authors used to keep the books moving. Congratulations on your new book. I am looking forward to reading Classified.

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  53. I love narrative non-fiction so this was really fun for me. Great selection. Thank you!

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  54. I've only read two so far, "The Tree Lady," and No Small Potatoes." Both were EXCELLENT! Hope to get the remaining three books soon. I loved your post!

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  55. LOVE your Classified book - inspirational. Thanks for making the time to help us out with ReFoReMo - all power to your pencil.

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  56. great way to approach the writing, love it!

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  57. Thank you for sharing these inspiring books with us! Great editions to our resource libraries!

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  58. A great selection of mentor tests - that I look forward to reading and learning from. Thanks!

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  59. I can't wait to get my hands on these. They look like they are right up my alley. Thanks for sharing.

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  60. Picture book biographies are an excellent way to inspire children with real life stories. This collection provides not only books that tell great accomplishments of real people, but books that are examples of great writing. I found several techniques that I would like to use and was definitely inspired to think about writing about some local heroes from my own town.
    No Small Potatoes: JuniusG. Groves and his Kingdom in Kansas by Tanya Bolden, illustrated by Don Tate told the story of a former slave who worked hard his whole life to achieve his goal of owning a potato farm and producing lots of potatoes. The author has written an extremely engaging story with the use of lots of details,statistics and figurative language.Beatrix Potter, Scientist by Lindsay Metcalf, illustrated byJunyl Wu tells little known facts about the well known children's author and her fascination with science and her struggle to get her work appreciated in her time as a female scientist. Her fascination with her natural surroundings will interest children today as well as her famous tales. Dinosaur Lady: The Daring Discoveries og Mary Anning, the First Paleontologist, written by Linda Skeers, illustrated by Marta Miguens tells how how as a child she discovered fossils and bones of early dinosaurs before they had even beenclassified by others. She was not scared of her discoveries even though others were and kept on making history with her finds. The way the book is written takes the reader along on the search. The Tree Lady: The Story of How One Tree-Loving Woman Changed A City Forever written by Joseph Hopkins, illustrated by Jill McElmurry tells the remarkable story of the women who created the San Diego Gardens where there were no trees at all. The refrain "But Kate did" capitivates the reader and keeps them enthralled in her accompishments. Classified: The Secret Career of Mary Golda Ross, Cherokee Aerospace Engineer by Traci Sorrell, illustrated by Natasha Donovan is another example of a stunningstory of a groundbreaking woman's accomplishments as an aerospace engineer and a Native American woman as well. All of these books were fascinating books to read and share with kids and inspiring to aspiring authors too.

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  61. Thank you for adding a couple of new bios to my list. TREE LADY is a particular favorite. I will be looking at them with a new lens now.

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  62. Thanks for a great list of books to study!

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  63. I love picture book biographies! Thanks for sharing this list.

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  64. Great choices for mentor texts. I will be rereading to read even closer.

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  65. I love the unique people authors present in their picture book biographies. And unique perspectives on people’s lives! Thanks for sharing this group of stories to explore.

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  66. Congratulations on your book! I have put it down to read and love how you used TREE ADY to inspire your biography structure. I have a biography I want to tackle and love haring how PB authors use other PB texts as mentor texts.

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  67. I've been reading many picture book biographies this past year and have been amazed at how creatively the subjects have been approached. I too enjoy finding books about people I've never even heard of before and learning so much.

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  68. I enjoy seeing various approaches to pb biographies.

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  69. I, too, love reading picture book biographies and enjoyed reading about each of these phenomenal people. I look forward to reading the rest of Classified.

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  70. I've always loved THE TREE LADY too! Must get yours next Traci!

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  71. A great group of books of this type have been written with Charles Darwin in mind.
    What Darwin Saw by Rosalyn Schanzer and Animals Charles Darwin Saw by Sandra Markle and also another one that sadly I can't think of the name of (and my library borrowing history (1200+ books) is not searchable arg!).

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  72. The picture book biographies are wonderful, introducing children to people who have made a difference. I love to see how the authors make the story accessible to children.

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  73. Such an interesting and diverse group of people who made a difference. I was especially excited to read about some people I was unaware of, such as Junius G. I teach high school, but I enjoy teaching about the power of inquiry using childrens books. Thank you

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  74. Unfortunately, my library didn't have any of these, so I need to do more digging. They all look wonderful. Thanks for the great list.

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  75. Thank you for the post! I love studying PB structures too!

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  76. I really enjoyed reading Beatrix Potter, Scientist. I had no idea she had other passions in addition to writing. I look forward to reading the other suggested mentor texts as well. Thank you!

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  77. Thanks, Traci, for this inspiring list of mentor texts. So many different structures and approaches to draw readers in.

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  78. Great post Traci! I loved seeing Lindsay Metcalf's bio of Beatrix Potter :)

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  79. Great list of mentor texts. Thanks!

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  80. evafelder@hotmail.com

    I was lucky enough to see you Traci in several interviews talking about your book Classified and read some reviews. I have not been able to read the book.
    So I chose one of your books which is not in today's list but somehow I needed to connect with you.
    So, OTSALIHELIGA for inspiring us to read biographies. I was touched by We Are Grateful, Otsaliheliga. We should learn a few things from your Nation, specially to be grateful throughout the year for any very simple aspect of our daily life. I like the way you incorporate, the Cherokee vocabulary and alphabet.
    All books are very inspiring, so many people straggling to follow their dreams.

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  81. Thank you, Traci, for highlighting these mentor texts that use questions in narrative nonfiction.

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  82. Thanks Traci. This is great list and can spark a lot of interests. Appreciate your books too!

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  83. I fell in love with The Tree Lady! Looking forward to reading the other books on your excellent list!

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  84. I also enjoyed the opening of No Small Potatoes.

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  85. Beatrix Potter Scientist by Lindsay H. Metcalf & Junyi Wu offered a lot of mentor text support for me. I want to write about a historical wall that has become a community park most neighbors don't know the history about. I didn't know how to start. This story helped me see how to merge what the reader knows along with what the reader may not know. I need to find out what the style of writing is where they have the staggered word choice making a shape on the paper. I've seen this in other stories and like that style. Buying Traci Sorell's book.

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  86. I've enjoyed the first four, and look forward to reading your book. Thanks for sharing such wonderful titles.

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  87. I could only find DINOSAUR LADY, and it was wonderful --story and art! Biographies are outside my usual interest, thanks for the push!

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  88. Thank you! Can't wait to read your book! Looking forward to using questions in my draft.

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  89. I love non-fiction and read many, many non-fiction bios. I especially loved No Small Potatoes. There are so many fascinating people to share with children. I'll get to some of the others shortly. Thanks for sharing this list.

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  90. I love biographies and this post. thank you. Some say there's been a glut on them but I can't stop writing PB biographies. They are fun to read, informative, and fun to research and write.

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  91. Fascinating biographies. Thanks for sharing them.

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  92. Interesting post, Traci. Especially interesting to find out how Beatrix Potter started drawing.

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  93. Unfortunately, my library only had 2 of these books (and one is out until the end of March), BUT I loved reading THE TREE LADY!!! My husband happens to be obsessed with San Diego and says we're going to retire there, so it was so interesting to read about the history of Balboa Park. I had no idea that there were so few trees there once upon a time. Such interesting history! Thank you for suggesting this book. I hopefully will be able to get my hands on the others soon as well. :)

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  94. Thanks, Traci. I love how biographies are so interesting these days! Dinosaur Lady is fabulous!

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  95. So far, I've only been able to get my hands on "Tree Lady" (enjoyed immensely!) & I'm looking forward to reading the rest. As someone who stays clear from NF bios written for adults, I love reading picturebook bios because they're so much more engaging & well, fun!

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  96. Beautiful books and so inspiring! I loved the undertones of women doing things they “shouldn’t” living in the times they did. Thanks for sharing this collection. I’ve already forwarded the Beatrix Potter title to a friend of mine. She read it to her class and took a walking field trip to the river to observe and draw, just like Beatrix!

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  97. The Tree Lady had me hooked from the opening lines.
    I didn't think it would.
    But it did!

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  98. I was able to read NO Small Potatoes while I wait for the others to come in. I write historical fiction chapter books but am studying the biographical picture books to see if there is a niche for my writing to expand into this market as well.

    Congrats on your book!

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  99. Thanks for this great list. I have some NF ideas and it's helpful to see how others handle the subject matter as I prepare venture into new writing territory.

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  100. I think questions are a great way to engage readers and pull them through the story, because they want to know the answer. Great idea to build structure around that technique.

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  101. All outstanding titles. I look forward to reading CLASSIFIED, Traci.

    Suzy Leopold

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  102. I was able to find a clip of you introducing your new book on youtube. I'm eager to read the whole thing, especially to study how THE TREE LADY served as your mentor text. Does yours have a refrain? I love "But Kate did" in THE TREE LADY. I loved your choice of PB biographies, each with a MC with a strong work ethic and a need to discover and learn. I'm inspired to find new unsung heroes.

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  103. Thanks for the great examples!

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  104. I think we can never have too many PB biographies. Love this list!

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  105. I'm very curious to see how these titles use questions to move the story along and engage readers. Thanks for sharing!

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  106. I love biographies! These are definitely great examples! Learning a lot! Thank you!

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  107. Questions work for most types of picture books, and other books!

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  108. Looking forward to picking these books up from my library for a deep dive into what keeps the story moving forward. Thanks!

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  109. Thank you, Traci. Yay! All these women scientists and such beautiful biographies!

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  110. What I loved about all three biographies was the angle that each author took as well as the work that went into bringing their story to light.

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  111. I just loved the Beatrix Potter story! Such an interesting facet of her life that we would have never known about. It really is true, I think, that reality can be more fascinating than fiction.

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  112. All great books

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  113. I love PB bios as they help kids connect with people they sometimes can’t find things in common with. Can’t wait to read Classified!

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  114. Great titles! I actually haven't read most of them until now...

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  115. These were wonderful titles. I especially loved Tree Lady and Dinosaur Lady. They were so interesting and well written for even little children to enjoy listening to them read.

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  116. I did not know the depths of Beatrix Potter's scientific endeavors. Looking forward to Classified--I'm first in line as soon as it arrives at the library. :)

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  117. Thank you for these beautiful picture book biographies today!

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  118. Great books! Thanks, Traci. A PB bio is just the right sized bite for me.

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  119. Thank you, Traci, for sharing your mentor texts for Classified.

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  120. This was such a great list of books to read. Especially, as I am working on a biography. They were all very interesting and helpful. I was lucky that CLASSIFIED is available on Hoopla. What a great story. Congratulations!

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  121. I love reading biographies and learning about people I'd never heard of before. I've never written a biography, but it's on my future to-do list.

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  122. Loved Tree Lady! Can't wait for the library to open later this week to pick up my stack of books. Thanks!

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  123. Thank you for sharing these great titles, Traci!

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  124. How fascinating to learn so much more about Beatrix Potter than that she wrote Peter Rabbit and a reminder to me to ask more questions about everything and to find answers to my grandsons' questions. And how inspiring to read about Junius G. Groves and a lifetime of hard work. I'm so pleased to read about how that hard work paid off for him. (I'm loving ReFoReMo for all of these books that I might never have read.)

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  125. Thank you for sharing these wonderful picture books!

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  126. Great titles to read and study, thank you

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  127. What an interesting selection of books! Thank you!

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  128. Thanks for these suggestions Traci. Anxiously waiting for my holds to come in!

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  129. I only found one of these books but I am scouring shelves to try to find similar ones. If you have more suggestions along these lines, I posted a request in the facebook group. I did enjoy Moon and Crayon Man during today's reads, though they don't fit the question/answer structure.

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  130. Thank you for these wonderful examples of pb biographies!

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  131. Thank you for your post with great examples of PB biographies.

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  132. I LOVE reading PB biographies! I am trying to wait as patiently as I can for my turn on my local library's hold list, but it is hard. :)

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  133. I read all of them. These texts felt I was in school, but I love learning. I especially loved learning about the Tree Lady.

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  134. I love looking at structure and asking questions of the reader. Thanks for these suggestion4.

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  135. I look forward to studying these books including yours. Thank you for sharing.

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  136. I love the voice of No Small Potatoes! And the story! :D

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  137. Thanks for these great examples, Traci!

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  138. Really loving non-fiction bios and this great list. Thank you and congratulations to you, Traci!

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  139. Some really great NF titles! I am looking forward to reading them all!

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  140. I ordered this book, received it, read it, thoroughly enjoyed it. Thank you.

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  142. Such a great round-up of question-centered texts. John Deere, That's Who! by Tracy Nelson Maurer is another example.

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  143. Thank you for this list! I hope to get to these books.

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  144. I always wonder if questions will be gimmicky. Thanks for the examples of how to do it well.

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  145. Tree Lady is so well-told! I love the variations of its refrain. I've known for a long time Beatrix Potter's early history and that of Mary Anning, but not Junius G. Groves. What happened to his empire?

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  146. Thank you Traci, I will check these out! I recently read Balloons Over Broadway, and that was the first picture book biography that really WOWED me with it's storytelling and got me hooked into reading about something I "wasn't interested in." Your book Classified looks like it will do the same! Thank you!

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  147. Thank you for these wonderful titles, Traci!

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  148. Thank you! Some great biographies here!

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  149. I am familiar with Tree Lady and look forward to reading the other books you recommended. It will be interesting to see how the authors utilized questions to enhance the text and move it forward.

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  150. Decided I'd try my hand at a PB biography

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  151. Traci,
    I love your other books and I look forward to reading Classified.
    Sue

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  152. There's no better hook than a question and a refrain. Thank you for bringing these books to our attention!

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  153. My little ones and I were mesmerized by DINOSAUR LADY. Looking forward to reading the others on the list, and especially CLASSIFIED. Thanks for the post, Traci!

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  154. Great selections! I learned so much!

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  155. So much variety in PB Biographies! Thanks for a wonderful list, Traci!

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  156. I taught second grade and every September we study how John Chapman ,AKA (Johnny Appleseed) as he was called, traveled all around and helped plant apple trees all over the USA. The story of The Tree Lady was a wonderful example of spreading trees all over a town instead of all over the world. This will be a great book to add to the curriculum of second great studies. Katherine Olivia Sessions, AKA (The Tree Lady) change San Diego for ever and so did Johnny Appleseed. Sorry I in reply
    Rhonda Kay Gatlin
    RhondaKay1

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  157. Exoduster ~ a new word for me! Thank you, Traci, for highlighting
    this compilation about the power of how one person with a vision can impact the world.
    I was especially touched by “Tree Lady,” a revelation.

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  158. I love, love, love narrative nonfiction! I learned so much while enjoying each book. I'm familiar with The Tree Lady. Thank you for introducing these fantastic mentor texts.

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  159. Thanks Traci! I can't wait to read CLASSIFIED!

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  160. Thank you for these inspiring suggestions!

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  161. Seek first to understand... through asking questions.

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  162. Thank you for these mentor texts as we consider writing nonfiction. I really wanted to read your story Classified, the Secret Life of Mary Golda Ross, but none of my libraries in a 30 mile radius. Could you do an author reading of your book for all of us to enjoy on You Tube? We would love to hear your voice and your story. Thanks!

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  163. Looking forward to reading your book and the entire list!

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  164. I was completely charmed by both "Dinosaur Lady" and "Tree Lady."

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  165. Hi Traci... thank you for sharing your inspiration for Classified. Always interested in learning from your process. :)

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  166. Thanks, Traci, for such a great list of biographies that inspire.

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  167. Thanks for this list of amazing books! I need to dig into more bios, so many fascinating stories out there.

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  168. I honestly learned something from these books that I had no idea about. Loved the book No Small Potatoes and Dinosaur lady. Well written, factual without being boring. Very well written, thank you for the suggestions for mentor text.

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  169. I love the accessibility of these texts for children as listeners and readers and the forward motion that the questions provided. Leaves me wondering and wanting more!

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  170. I look forward to seeing how questions are used in these picture book biographies.

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  171. Fact is often stranger than, and more entertains than fiction. I agree!

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  172. I have yet to try writing a biography, but I have a few ideas I'd like to explore. This post is timely, and has given me some great examples to study. Thank you!

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  173. I don't normally read PB biographies. Thank you for sharing this post and these "new to me" titles.

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  174. I really enjoyed reading these biographies. Each writer did a fantastic job of bringing these historical characters to life in an enjoyable, page-turning story for kids.

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  175. Thanks for a great list- these were some new ones for me!

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  176. I love the accessibility of these texts for children and the forward motion that the questions provide.

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  177. Thanks, Traci. I enjoyed all of these titles that help readers find the answers to questions about important topics.

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  178. To be honest, nonfiction are never my go to selections especially when reading to the developmentally delayed children I worked with. Thank you for these recommendations!

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  179. Thank you for these wonderful, engaging mentor texts. I love how Classified shows - and validates - a different set of values than the dominant culture, and it's just a great story as well. My father was an aerospace engineer from the 1960's-1990's, and I wonder if he knew of Mary Golda Ross.

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  180. I love, love, love Tree Lady! And narrative nonfiction is my thing too! What's better than reading an amazing, well-crafted story that's true?!

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  181. I love Tree Lady, and I have had an idea for a PB biography for the longest time. These texts help give me direction and inspiration to get that story written. Thank you!

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  182. I am so appreciative of the authors that spend so much dedicated time and effort in research in order to introduce young readers to unsung heroes.

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  183. Your book Classified sounds very interesting! Biographies are so interesting.

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  184. I have read most of these but need to find No Small Potatoes. I used questions in one of my pb bios and I love doing that.

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  185. I’m bummed my library only had 2 of your recommended books. I’ll have to keep searching for the rest. Thanks for sharing!

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  186. I had not read some of these these books, so it was nice to add new titles to my biography structure reading.

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